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When it comes to buying and selling homes, most contracts include a contingency that will allow buyers to back out or re-negotiate the sale based on issues found during a home inspection.

Selling a home can be stressful, to feel confident in the sale of your home check out these common home issues before listing.

We recommend a pre-sale home inspection – which may even sweeten your home sale by adding an element of transparency when you share the report with the buyers agent.

 Basement Moisture - HudsonHomeTeam

Basement Moisture

Regardless if your basement is beautifully finished or could have been the location for the latest big screen thriller, a major issue found in home inspections is moisture or seepage.

If your basement shows signs of moisture, leakage or has an air of dampness you may have an issue.  Call a trusted home inspector to get the lay of the land, or a contractor who specializes in basement repair.

The possibility of basement flooding will not appeal to even the savviest of ‘fixer upper’ home buyers.

 

Poor Workmanship - HudsonHomeTeamOutdated Roof

The hat for your home.  Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but if your roof is old you run the risk of facing major leaks during the next rainy season.

If left unattended, an old roof may lead to major damage of other existing home systems and property.  If your shingles are peeling and look old, you likely need a new roof – get on the phone and start calling local roofing companies.



Poor Workmanship

DIYers take heed!  There are (for example) building codes for things like your deck, car port, garage, retaining walls, plumbing, electrical and other home projects and systems.

Outdated Roof - HudsonHomeTeam

If you are going to tackle these projects yourself, make sure to do your research and learn what building code requirements exist in your city.  Better yet, have a professional come double check your work before you pat yourself on the back  – it could save you from property damage, personal injury, costly lawsuits, or the sale of your home.

 

 

 

 

Maintenance

All major components of your home do require maintenance.  Just as you get an oil change, replace brake pads, and rotate tires on your vehicle, your home needs regular attention and cleaning.

Be sure to pay attention to things like furnace and central air maintenance, cleaning dryer vents, water heaters, exhaust fan filers for your stove, check caulking in places like tubs and shower surrounds yearly.  Prevention is better than a cure – and it costs less!

 Checklist - HudsonHomeTeam


 

 

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courtesy of Business Insider

It turns out homebuyers are really into barn doors.


Screen Shot 2016 04 13 at 8.26.06 AM

 

 


When Zillow looked at design features that sell homes at the best price and with the shortest listing time, that feature topped the list. 

Anything craftsman-style, like rectangular farmhouse sinks, also got homes off the market at a premium. 

 

Zillow Digs screened over 2 million listings for homes sold between January 2014 and March 2016 and looked for the keywords that had the best effect on how much more than the expected price and how much faster they sold.  

Here are the top 15 design features:

Outdoor kitchen


Outdoor kitchen

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 3.7%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 19

 

Tankless water heater


Tankless water heater

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 43

 


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Backsplash

 


Backsplash


Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.1%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 46

Granite


granite
Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.1%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 38

 

Stainless Steel

stainless-steel HudsonHomeTeam

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.2%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 42

 

Heated floors


heated-floors HudsonHomeTeam
Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.3%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 28

 

Frameless shower


frameless-shower HudsonHomeTeam
Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.6%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 38

 

Pendant light

 


pendant-light HudsonHomeTeam


Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.6%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 48

 

Exposed brick

exposed-brick HudsonHomeTeam

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 4.9%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 36

 

Craftsman

craftsman HudsonHomeTeam

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 5.4%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 14

 

Quartz

quartz HudsonHomeTeam

 

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 6.0%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 50

 

Subway tile

subway-tile hudsonHomeTeam

 

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 6.9%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 63

 

Farmhouse sink

farmhouse-sink HudsonHomeTeam


Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 7.9%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 58

 

Shaker cabinet

shaker-cabinet HudsonHomeTeam

 

Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 9.6%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 45

 

Barn door

 


barn-door HudsonHomeTeam


Percent of homes that sell for above expected values: 13.4%

How many days faster than expected the home sells: 57

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To all "Property Brothers" or "Love it or List it" fans:

Have you ever been flipping through the channels, only to find yourself glued to the couch in an HGTV ‘show hole’*? We’ve all been there… watching entire seasons of“Love it or List it,” “Fixer Upper,” “House Hunters,” “Flip or Flop,” “Property Brothers,”and so many more, just in one sitting. Sad to admit it, but I have done that too...

When you’re in the middle of your real estate themed show marathon, you might start to think that everything you see on TV must be how it works in real life, but you may need a reality check.

Reality TV Show Myths vs. Real Life:
Myth #1: Buyers look at 3 homes and make a decision to purchase one of them.

Truth: There may be buyers who fall in love and buy the first home they see, but more often than not the process of buying a home means touring more than three homes.

Myth #2: The houses the buyers are touring are still for sale.

Truth: The reality is being staged for TV. Many of the homes being shown are already sold and are off the market.

Myth #3: The buyers haven’t made a purchase decision yet.

Truth: Since there is no way to show the entire buying process in a 30-minute show, TV producers often choose buyers who are further along in the process and have already chosen a home to buy.

Myth #4: If you list your home for sale, it will ALWAYS sell at the Open House.

Truth: Of course this would be great! Open Houses are important to guarantee the most exposure to buyers in your area, but are only a PIECE of the overall marketing of your home. Just realize that many homes are sold during regular listing appointments as well.

Myth #5: Homeowners make a decision about selling their home after a 5-minute conversation.

Truth: Similar to the buyers portrayed on the shows, many of the sellers have already spent hours deliberating the decision to list their home and move on with their life/goals.

Bottom Line

Having an experienced professional on your side while navigating the real estate market is the best way to guarantee that you can make the home of your dreams a reality. And speaking with a local lender about your financial situation will ensure that you are protected throughout the transaction. Ask your lender how strong your pre-approval should be to beat other offers.

*Show Hole - A side effect of binge-watching. Symptoms include a sense of emptiness and depression brought on by realizing you just wasted a good portion of your life watching several seasons of a TV show or an entire movie franchise all at once when you could have managed your time better.

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Good Morning!

 

Looks a bit cloudy this AM but it should be nicer later on.

 

Watch for a schwack (not a real word) of Neighbourhood Garage Sales coming up over the next coupe of months.
So far we have confirmed South Meridian, Bayridge and Rosemary Heights school catchments for Spring.

 

 

Look for our new logo’s signs  in coming weeks as well!

 

Click below, on our (complimentary for your use) directional sign to go to this weekend’s map.

 

 

 


 



Click our new logo below to take you to the latest Open Houses and listings in South Surrey & White Rock.



 

 


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It’s probably not a coincidence that spring is a popular time to deep clean your house and also a great time to list it for sale. Any good agent will tell you that cleaner houses always sell faster and for higher prices, so taking some time to really make your home sparkle is almost always worth the extra effort.

Spring-Cleaning.jpg

 

 

 

Of course, clean is also a very relative term. What some people see as clean, others just won’t be satisfied with. And when you are expecting to welcome a steady stream of potential buyers into your home, you definitely want to make sure that you have all of your bases covered.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at six areas that sellers often overlook when spring cleaning their homes with the intention of listing them for sale.

The Windows: Both Inside and Outside

One of the most important things that you can do to really help your home shine is clean the windows.

And it’s not enough to simply wipe them off from the inside. Getting the outsides clean too will more than double the positive impact this job will have on the way your home looks.

Having crystal clear windows has two specific benefits. First, clean windows will let in more natural light, brightening your entire home. As if that wasn’t enough, clean windows will also invite perspective buyers to appreciate whatever views you might have.


 


Inside the Kitchen Cabinets

Everyone who plans on listing their home knows that they need to clean the kitchen countertops and scrub the floors. But not everyone realizes that home buyers will want to see what the insides of your kitchen cabinets look like.

Would looking inside your cabinets cast your home in a positive light? What about that junk drawer in the kitchen?

Drapes & Light Fixtures

Another commonly overlooked area that could probably use some cleaning is your drapes and light fixtures. Dusting them off is a good place to start, but why stop there?

Take those light fixtures down and wash them out, and when was the last time that you actually washed the drapes? You’ll be shocked at the difference clean light fixtures and freshly washed drapes will make in the way your home presents itself.

The Office Area

You know that one spot where all the bills tend to pile up while you are putting off sitting down to pay them? That’s another place that lots of sellers forget to take care of during their spring cleaning.

In addition to being neat and tidy, your home office area needs to look functional. Make sure that anyone who walks through your home will be able to see themselves working productively there.

The Overstuffed Linen Closet

The linen closet upstairs (the one that has never really been big enough) is another place that can really turn off potential buyers. In order to make it look more roomy, take as much of your stuff out of it as possible and put it in storage until your home sells!

You should also make sure that everything in the bathroom medicine cabinet is neat and tidy.

 



Don’t Forget the Outside

While most spring cleaning efforts are focused on the inside of the house, you definitely don’t want to overlook the outside of your home.

Make sure that there isn’t anything in the yard that doesn’t belong there, and spruce up any landscaping that looks like it might detract from a potential buyers first impression.

While you’re at it, you might also want to get out the ladder and give those gutters some attention.

One of the best practices to make sure that your spring cleaning efforts are successful is to simply start over every time you think that you are finished. There is literally no end to the amount of cleaning you can do, and every single bit of that effort will help to sell your house faster for a higher price.

 

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Want some insider advice on updating and upgrading your home? Real Simple asked readers what they wish they had known before—or would have done differently with—their renos.

By Betsy Goldberg


kitchen-renovated

Photo by Robert George Young/Getty Images

 

“I would have made sure there was more insulation in the wall where the bathroom butts up against a bedroom. My daughter is awakened by every sound in the bathroom. We should have put the closet where her bed is now.” —Ali Dubin

“I would have stuck to my original plan for a stainless steel sink instead of doing a black stone composite sink. Softened water leaves a haze on it, and the sink chips.” —Jennifer Mason Theroux


“Have a guaranteed end date in the contract with your contractor, with a fee for any day that goes over. Mine went months over while the contractor worked on jobs for other people.” —L.S.

“Set aside extra money for unforeseen expenses like rotted wood, consults with a plumber, and the replacement of exterior fixtures. It isn’t realistic to think that everything will work out exactly the way it’s supposed to.” —M.P.N.
“I would have put in more electrical outlets on our kitchen island.” —Jennifer Lijertwood

 


“Don’t underestimate how much construction dust will permeate the rest of your living spaces through the air and ducts. Remove valuable objects from the walls or displays so you’re not having to micro-clean, and seal off any closets that contain clothes, linens, and food.” —Deborah Fairchild
“Make sure you have all the materials before starting. Some of our items took months to come in after ordering, which held up the work. Four months is a long time to be without a kitchen!” —Victoria Wagner
“When we redid our kitchen, I wish we had included ‘eating out’ in the budget!”—Maria C. Kuntz

 

Article courtesy of realsimple.com

 

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WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

More fires start in the kitchen than in any other room.

 

Those fires can be expensive; since even a minor incident, with no injuries, can result in significant damage.

That’s why it’s important to keep up with the latest in fire prevention.

 

The most recent research tells us:

  • Never leave cooking food unattended. Doing so is the number one cause of kitchen fires.
  • Make sure cooking appliances, especially deep fryers, are safety certified by the appropriate government agency.
  • When using oil in a frying pan, always heat slowly at no more than a medium heat setting.
  • Always turn off stove burners and other cooking appliances immediately after cooking.
  • Never attempt to put out a grease fire with water. Use baking soda or a fire extinguisher.
  • Never remove or cover up a smoke detector due to nuisance alarms. The one alarm that isn’t a nuisance may save your life.

Finally, experts say that if you can’t put out a fire immediately, get everyone out of the home and call emergency services.


Get more useful tips and learn what makes HudsonHomeTeam better when you are looking to sell your #SouthSurrey #WhiteRock home.

 

Logo 2016 LD

 

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HudsonHomeTeam - Home Insurance Tips

 


Pools, finished basements and shingled roofs are a few of the 14 home elements that can increase your home insurance costs.

Some of the costliest items, according to Alexey Saltykov, co-founder and CEO of InsurEye Inc., a Canadian insurance-services company, are the old home elements that haven’t been upgraded: oil-based heating, wooden stoves, knob and tube wiring, and aluminum wiring.

“Some insurers will not insure you at all, some will require an inspection, and some will classify you as high-risk,” Saltykov said.

And then there are costs for using your home as a business that you might not even have considered.

Most elements are “pretty intuitive,” according to Saltykov. Yet homeowners love to add some of the newer elements, or perceive them as adding value to their home.

Let’s assume an average cost to rebuild value, or building limit, of $300,000. A finished basement leads to 20 per cent more in insurance payments, due to potential flooding, according to the president and CEO of Square One Insurance Services Inc., Daniel Mirkovic.

And a pool “increases the estimated cost to rebuild your home by about $5,000, or six per cent. That will drive the classification of a home into a higher building limit,” while adding about $30 a year in personal and premises liability premiums, Mirkovic said.

Mirkovic says wood shake or shingle roofing can push insurance up over 10 per cent in some cases, if the home is in an area prone to hail or wind. Further, “If your home’s roof is nearing (or has passed) the end of its expected useful life, you may pay as much as 10 per cent more on your home insurance.”

Stone or metal roofs are the best options to reduce insurance costs, according to Saltykov, because they are more durable.

And gardens? According to Mirkovic, traditional pre-packaged policies include coverage for landscaping, fences and gardening equipment, allow you to apply up to five per cent of your building limit towards trees, shrubs, etc. “In our [$300,000] example, this would provide up to $6,000 of coverage for landscaping.” These policies, however, will not pay more than $1,000 for any one tree.

Saltykov says home improvements such as home alarms, upgrading wiring and plumbing, and fire-monitoring systems, will bring premiums back down again.

Here are 14 elements, some old, some new, for your consideration.

  1. Expensive items: Jewellery, art, musical instruments, wine collections, high-end watches, sporting equipment and bicycles –  lead to extra premiums, or “riders,” for coverage. Keep track.
  1. Swimming pools: Pools obviously represent higher liability because of the potential for drowning,
    liability goes up when not protected by a fence.
  1. Fireplace/woodstove: Wood stoves are a source of fire and smoke damage. Insurers will look for additional premiums and/or require a home inspection first.
  1. Oil-based heating: You’ll have trouble getting insurance if you still have an oil-based heating system
    since these result in environmental hazards and can cause fire. Insurers prefer electric heat or
    forced-air gas furnaces.
  1. Business property: Double the trouble: both your personal contents and business property could be lost
    or damaged, stolen or vandalized.
  1. Home being a part of your business: Bed and breakfasts, daycare, and customers or suppliers visiting your home: will all send you back to the policy drawing board.
  1. Aluminum wiring: A type of wiring used in houses up to 1970, insurers don’t like it because of its
    potential to overheat and cause fires. Policies for houses with aluminum wiring will be either more expensive or harder to get.
  1. Knob and tube wiring: This very old wiring – not well-suited to today’s high energy consumption levels – requires connectors that use knobs to keep the wires isolated. Insulating tubes guide wires through walls. You’ll either have to get the house rewired or pay an additional premium.
  1. Old house elements: Roofing and other aging house factors leads to more expensive insurance or sometimes not at all until there’s an upgrade.
  1. Galvanized or lead pipes: Galvanized or lead pipes are older types more likely to build up corrosion, resulting in a negative impact on water pressure and water quality. Insurers prefer modern plastics or copper pipes.
  1. Roof type:  The least reliable roofs are wood shake or shingle, because of vulnerability to weather hazards, which are on the rise.
  1. Building frame: Wood frame homes are more likely to suffer from fire. Insurers like concrete or brick homes.
  1. Basement: Finished basements drive up costs because of potential damage if a pipe bursts or sewage backs up, or there’s flooding.
  1. Garden and Trees: No risk here! But in most cases you do have to pay extra if you want this type of coverage, if you’ve spent a lot of money and are worried about losing this beauty to weather, vandalism,
    etc.

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