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This is the first Garage Sale Map for 2017!
We weren't sure the weather would ever allow us to have any more garage sales!
Look for a number of neighbourhood events coming in May!

Click on the
Local Garage Sales
logo above for this week's map! 


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HudsonHomeTeam

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Surrey, BC V4A 4N6

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Celebrated chef Vikram Vij teams with Vancouver-based Arts Umbrella to offer cooking classes to teens

Feb. 28th, 2017

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Local chef Vikram Vij is partnering with Arts Umbrella’s South Surrey arm to share his culinary expertise with teens.

The celebrated restaurateur will be offering three separate three-hour cooking workshops at My Shanti(15869 Croydon Drive, South Surrey), the youngest of his three local eateries, on March 25, April 29, and May 27. There, budding young chefs will learn the fundamentals of producing a family-style dish alongside Vij himself.

 

“I’m extremely passionate about teaching young people about Indian food,” said Vij in a media statement. “Not only that; this is a perfect partnership with Arts Umbrella. In the same way you take a script or an art assignment and add your own personality, I want these students to take a recipe and make it their own—adding extra spices, different flavours, and to adapt a recipe to something that’s uniquely theirs.”

The classes will help Arts Umbrella, a Vancouver-based non-profit that provides access to arts education for kids, expand beyond its visual art, theatre, and dance offerings to include the culinary arts.

 

 

Chef Vikram Vij’s cooking workshops are open to youth aged 13 to 18. To register for a class, contact Arts Umbrella South Surrey by emailor phone at 604-535-1127.

 

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Updated CMHC homebuying guide encourages long-term thinking

Feb. 28th, 2017

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., has updated its free guide to the process of buying a home, with an emphasis on encouraging Canadians to think long term about what kind of home they should buy — or whether they would be better off renting.

The national housing agency first released the guide, called Homebuying Step by Step, in 1998, but has updated it over the years. The latest version streamlines the document, splitting off workbook content and making it available online as a series of interactive printable checklists and questionnaires.


Homebuying - HudsonHomeTeam


The previous iteration of the guide received almost eight million unique page views in 2016 alone, according to CMHC.

The guide is meant for any prospective homebuyer, but first-time buyers could particularly benefit from reading it, said Ina Wielinga, a consultant at CMHC who updated the guide. She said the new version puts a greater focus on calculating the true cost of owning a home over time, emphasizing costs like taxes, utilities and repairs.

"This used to be peppered through the document, but we're bringing it up front because people often get focused on acquisition," said Wielinga.

The new guide also encourages readers to reflect on what kind of home suits their lifestyle, and whether or not homeownership is a better financial choice than renting.

"It's not just buying that house that's brick and mortar," said Wielinga. "There's a lifestyle that goes with it also."

By asking would-be homeowners to consider how a home will fit into their lives over the long term, Wielinga said, the guide could help users feel more confident about their purchase.

Key concepts to consider

The most confusing concept in the guide is also one of the most important ideas to understand before buying a home, according to Wielinga: calculating your gross debt service ratio (also known as the gross debt-to-income ratio) and total debt service ratio (also known as the total debt-to-income ratio).

Click on image below for your copy:


 


The CMHC guide for homebuyers is available for free online. (CMHC)

The gross debt service ratio includes total monthly housing costs, which CMHC says should be no more than 32 per cent of average gross monthly income. The total debt service ratio covers all monthly debt payments, including housing costs. CMHC recommends that ratio not exceed 40 per cent of average gross monthly income.

"You have to understand that, even if you're the best person in the world and you know you can afford it, you have to follow that kind of guideline," said Wielinga.

Financial axioms like these are often left unexplained to potential homebuyers, said Wielinga.

"Honestly, it's not talked about enough," she said. "I think when we do explain it to people, then they do get it."

 

Tighter rules

The rules for Canadian homebuyers have been changing quickly, especially as the government tries different policies to mitigate risk in the real estate market.

For that reason, the guide avoids getting into the details of certain aspects of homebuying, like calculating mortgage loan insurance. Instead, it refers readers to the CMHC website, where the details of mortgage rules can be quickly updated as the government changes them.

Lauren Haw, CEO of an online real estate brokerage, lauded CMHC for its interactive workbook for prospective homebuyers, although she's skeptical that many people will actually take the time to sit down and read the guide in full.

"People like to have it and hold it, but most first-time homebuyers don't seem to ingest the information in this format very well," said Haw. "Because even if you give them these documents, very few people are the personality type that will read it and really truly understand it."

Haw said real estate brokers often end up explaining these concepts to their clients as they go through the buying process.

​"If everybody would sit down and read one of these things, I think we'd have much more informed buyers," she said.

 

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When it comes to buying and selling homes, most contracts include a contingency that will allow buyers to back out or re-negotiate the sale based on issues found during a home inspection.

Selling a home can be stressful, to feel confident in the sale of your home check out these common home issues before listing.

We recommend a pre-sale home inspection – which may even sweeten your home sale by adding an element of transparency when you share the report with the buyers agent.

 Basement Moisture - HudsonHomeTeam

Basement Moisture

Regardless if your basement is beautifully finished or could have been the location for the latest big screen thriller, a major issue found in home inspections is moisture or seepage.

If your basement shows signs of moisture, leakage or has an air of dampness you may have an issue.  Call a trusted home inspector to get the lay of the land, or a contractor who specializes in basement repair.

The possibility of basement flooding will not appeal to even the savviest of ‘fixer upper’ home buyers.

 

Poor Workmanship - HudsonHomeTeamOutdated Roof

The hat for your home.  Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but if your roof is old you run the risk of facing major leaks during the next rainy season.

If left unattended, an old roof may lead to major damage of other existing home systems and property.  If your shingles are peeling and look old, you likely need a new roof – get on the phone and start calling local roofing companies.



Poor Workmanship

DIYers take heed!  There are (for example) building codes for things like your deck, car port, garage, retaining walls, plumbing, electrical and other home projects and systems.

Outdated Roof - HudsonHomeTeam

If you are going to tackle these projects yourself, make sure to do your research and learn what building code requirements exist in your city.  Better yet, have a professional come double check your work before you pat yourself on the back  – it could save you from property damage, personal injury, costly lawsuits, or the sale of your home.

 

 

 

 

Maintenance

All major components of your home do require maintenance.  Just as you get an oil change, replace brake pads, and rotate tires on your vehicle, your home needs regular attention and cleaning.

Be sure to pay attention to things like furnace and central air maintenance, cleaning dryer vents, water heaters, exhaust fan filers for your stove, check caulking in places like tubs and shower surrounds yearly.  Prevention is better than a cure – and it costs less!

 Checklist - HudsonHomeTeam


 

 

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(courtesy of peacearchnews.com)

Curry battle in Surrey: It's Indian vs. Thai in special event dubbed 'Mae Shanti' - White Rock News

 Chefs Vikram Vij (left) and Angus An. - submitted

Chefs Vikram Vij (left) and Angus An.

 

SURREY — The table is set for a curry battle in Surrey next month.

A culinary showdown of sorts will take place at South Surrey's My Shanti restaurant on Monday, March 13, featuring its owner/operator, Vikram Vij, and fellow award-winning chef Angus An, from Kitslano's celebrated eatery, Maenam.

This curry fight is Indian versus Thai.

 

How Much is My Home Worth Button
 

In a ticketed, $125-a-head event, the chefs will go head-to-head as they demonstrate the best cuisine of their native countries.

An and Vij will collaborate on canapés and dessert, but it is the main courses where they will duel it out over meat, seafood, rice and noodles, giving diners the chance to decide for themselves. With each course, diners will also enjoy wine pairings from B.C. wineries.


Another Reason We live in


         #SouthSurrey #WhiteRock



"This Asian curry showdown will take place over five courses where both Chefs and their teams will prepare dishes in the one-night-only 'Mae Shanti' kitchen to represent their respective countries," according to an event advisory.

Says Vij: “There are amazing curries in both Indian and Thai cuisine, and while the ingredients are sometimes similar, they retain distinctive flavours. We want to highlight those differences, while giving our diners the chance to compare the dishes.”

Adds An: “It’s not often I can showcase Thai cuisine right beside Indian curry. I’m looking forward to being able to illustrate the differences to diners as they savour every flavour.”

To reserve a table, email Namaste@myshanti.comwith the subject line “Mae Shanti.”

My Shanti is located at 15869 Croydon Dr., Surrey.

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(courtesy of urbansurrey.com)

Surrey population surpasses 500,000; doubles Vancouver in growth

tvqvafbSurrey City Centre

Census data released today by Statistics Canada has revealed that Surrey’s population has surpassed 500,000. As of May 2016 last year, the population of Surrey was 517,887, an increase from 468,251 in 2011 representing a growth rate of 10.6%, outpacing the national average, British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, and the Vancouver CMA.

In comparison, between 2011 and 2016:

  • Canada as a whole grew by 5.0%
  • British Columbia grew by 5.6%
  • City of Vancouver grew by 4.6%
  • Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area (CMA): 6.5%

The only Vancouver CMA municipality to grow faster than Surrey was the Township of Langley which grew at a rapid 12.6%. As a whole, the Vancouver CMA grew to 2,463,431.

With Surrey adding an average of 1,000 new residents per month, as of February 2017, the population of Surrey can be estimated to have already increased further to 525,000. It is expected that Surrey will surpass Vancouver in population to become the largest city in BC by 2030.



Looking at growth by Census Tract, the areas of Surrey growing the fastest were in the south and east, in places such as Grandview Heights, Sunnyside Heights, South Newton, and Clayton. There was also noticeably strong growth in Surrey City Centre as a result of new condo developments in recent years, with one Census Tract east of King George Blvd and south of 104th Avenue growing by 33%. This growth in City Centre will likely increase even more by the 2021 Census, with more new condo developments expected to be completed within City Centre in the next 5 years than in the previous 5 years.

Developable land and affordability in comparison to Vancouver can both be seen as driving factors in Surrey’s strong growth.

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Growth rate by Census Tract in Metro Vancouver


 

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Growth rate by Census Tract in North Surrey – Area east of King George Blvd and south of 104th Ave grew by 33%.

https://censusmapper.ca/maps/583#11/49.2613/-123.1145

By Stephen Hallingham|
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In all the excitement and packing, buying & selling, many people forget to take care of some essential items before they move.  Don’t look past these 5 things you need to take care of, or it could cost you $$$.

moving -boxes -HudsonHomeTeam

  1. 1. Take care of all subscriptions: Magazines, memberships, recurring orders, gym memberships.  Get a head start on updating your address or cancelling memberships before charges mount on your credit card.  We suggest you take care of this at least 30 days prior to your move, as many gyms, clubs, and mail subscriptions require this much time for cancellation or updates.
  1. 2. Change your address at the post office: For a small fee Canada Post will allow you to register your new address to ensure all your mail finds its way to your new home.  Leaving bills or an outstanding balance behind, may impact your credit score, as well as lead to accumulated interest charges -–neither of which you are likely o want.
  1. 3. Call utility providers: Cable, internet, electricity, gas, etc…These are all services that you should be making contact BEFORE you move. Many of these services can pivot on a dime so not much notice is required, but we do recommend making contact at least 1 week prior to your move date.  Make a list of required utility providers & check it twice!  Or, you could wind up paying for someone else’s electric bill!

movingbycar - HudsonHomeTeam

4. Manage your motor vehicle insurance: If you are new to British Columbia here is what you need to know; ICBC allows up to 90 days to switch over your license, and 30 days to register, license and insure your vehicle.

If you are moving within the Province, you must update your address within 30 days of moving.  Your auto-insurance policy must always show your current home address and vehicle use, so do not forget to update this information!

5. Get a ‘To-Go’ box ready: Whether you are moving across the country, province, or just down the street, make sure that you have a go-to box ready. This should contain items you will need as soon as you get to your new home; cleaning products, toilet paper, garbage bags, paper towels, clean sheets, fresh towels, paper plates and eating utensils and maybe even a bottle of bubbly to celebrate.


Celebrate - HudsonHomeTeam


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Home sales dropped, prices remained strong and one property type bucked the trend... Let our useful infographic make sense of Fraser Valley real estate stats

REW.ca
January 5, 2017
FVREB-Stats-Dec-2016-crop

Despite a slow December, 2016 was the busiest year on record for property sales in the Fraser Valley, beating out the previous record set in 2005, according to statistics released January 4 by the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board.

Home sales dropped in December but prices remained strong – and one property type saw higher resales than one year previously.

Check out our infographic below to see the breakdown of sales by property type and prices by individual area. 

To read the full story and analysis of Fraser Valley sales from December and the whole of 2016, click here.

 

FVREB-Stats-Dec-2016
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