Google+

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

 

 

This summer, the City of White Rock and the White Rock Business Improvement Association have partnered to bring a free trolley service to White Rock! You can hop-on and hop-off on weekends, holidays and during select special events* from June 24 to September 4.

There are stops located throughout the City, so check the schedule below to find the closest one to you and begin exploring our beautiful City by the Sea!


 

 

                    

 

 

 

 

 

                     

Garage Sale Sign

 

 

 

*Some special event days have different schedules and/or routes. The alternate routes and times will be posted on this webpage.

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story


Jun. 1st, 2017

Delta Highrise - HudsonHomeTeam

The proposed development site on 120 Street and 75A Avenue. (James Smith photo)

 

If approved, it would be the second such development along Scott Road after the 37-story Delta Rise.

A potential 35-storey residential development on Scott Road is advancing to public consultation after approval from council on Monday, May 29.

The application is for a 35-storey residential building with limited commercial space at ground level and several three-storey townhouse units at the northwest corner of 75A Avenue and Scott Road. The building would have underground parking, accessible from 119A Street.

Council’s approval means the consultation process for the proposed development can begin; it does not necessarily mean the development will be approved for construction.

The public consultation process will include placing public notice signs along the properties on 120 Street, 75A Avenue and 119A street; sending notices to surround property owners; holding a public information meeting to introduce the proposed development; and holding a public hearing if the application proceeds past second reading.

 

 

Community planning and development director Jeff Day said the developers want “to move this forward as quickly as possible.”

“I anticipate the public information meeting would happen before true summer comes in,” he continued.

At the public information meeting, information on the building’s amenities will be brought forward. Currently, the development includes limited commercial spaces on the ground floor of the building, including a coffee shop and a business office because, Day said, “we don’t want to dilute the commercial along Scott Road.”

If the development is approved, the six properties covered by the development would be rezoned from multi-unit residential properties and medium density residential properties to mixed use properties.

“It’s just at the preliminary stage right now,” Day said. “There’s a lot of things we need to go through in terms of the form and the character of [the development].”

The development’s design will be brought forward during first and second readings, giving council members and the public a chance to weigh in on what the building would look like.

“At this point, we’re satisfied that it’s developed to a mark … that council would expect where we are able to take it out to the public,” Delta CAO George Harvie said during the May 29 council meeting. “But we always come back with some good additions and modifications based on public consultation.”

If approved, this would be the second high rise along that stretch of Scott Road. Delta Rise, which was officially completed on May 6, 2017, is a 37-storey residential building on 120 Street and 80 Avenue.

The new proposed development is located within the area covered by the Scott Road revitalization bylaw, which has established reduced municipal fees and taxes to encourage commercial and high density residential development along the Delta/Surrey border.

However, the proposed development would not automatically qualify for those bylaw incentives: eligibility has to be determined first.

The application for the building was put forward by developers Arzone Real Estate Investment Ltd. and Hari Homes Incorporated.

Both parties has been involved in other North Delta development proposals in the past, including a 20-unit townhouse development proposal on 84th Avenue and 115 Street.


Delta Highrise drawings  - HudsonHomeTeam


An application for a 35-storey high rise on 120th Street was approved by council on Monday, May 29. The proposed development will no go through several stages of public consultation. (Council report photo)

Delta Highrise drawings 2 - HudsonHomeTeam

An application for a 35-storey high rise on 120th Street was approved by council on Monday, May 29. The proposed development will no go through several stages of public consultation. (Council report photo)

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

 

Click for Map

This is the first Garage Sale Map for 2017!
We weren't sure the weather would ever allow us to have any more garage sales!
Look for a number of neighbourhood events coming in May!

Click on the
Local Garage Sales
logo above for this week's map! 


HudsonHomeTeam
604-773-3940




Copyright © 2017 HudsonHomeTeam, All rights reserved.
Because we care about you (and you like us). :)
Our mailing address is:

HudsonHomeTeam

1 - 1920 152 St.

Surrey, BC V4A 4N6

Canada

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

Prosecco to Port

Saturday, April 29, 2017
7:00 - 10:00 pm
Hazelmere Golf Course, 18150 8 Ave, Surrey

 

Chase--Badger_01.jpg

(Get Directions)

Tickets: $70

To purchase tickets by cheque/cash please contact:Tracy La Chance, SALI Board Member:
tracy@sali.ca

604-218-8364 To purchase tickets via credit card:

news-button.pngAll proceeds help at-risk children & animals in your community.

Prosecco_to_Port_graphic.jpg

As the name implies, this tasty fundraising event begins with a glass of Prosecco and ends with a sweet bit of port!

Join us in raising money to help at-risk youth and animals in your community, and have fun at the same time.

The evening starts at 7pm with Prosecco on arrival, plus wine tasting and plenty of hors d'oeuvres, too.

Click the button above to reserve your tickets now before they sell out!

 

Join us for

Wine tasting

Hors d'oeuvres

Live music

Silent auction

Wine & beer raffles

Purchase your tickets instantly by clicking "Buy Now" at the top of this page.

For questions, or more information, please contact Tracy at tracyl@sali.ca or 604.218.8364

Sponsorship from this event allows SALI to pass 100% of donations from this event straight to helping at-risk children and at-risk animals. We are deeply grateful. A big thanks to the following companies and individuals who make SALI's work possible.

The Suede Dogs will be providing live music for this event! Learn more about them at suededogs.com.

Sali_Suede_Dogs_logo.jpg

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

BC Soccer is proud to be collaborating with Surrey United, Canucks Autism Network, Vancouver Whitecaps FC, City of Surrey, and Sport Surrey to offer a FREE coaching workshop supporting kids with autism

Vancouver BC, February 23, 2017 -  BC Soccer in partnership with Surrey United Soccer Club, Canucks Autism Network, Vancouver Whitecaps FC, City of Surrey, and Sport Surrey will be holding a coaching workshop supporting kids with autism at Cloverdale Athletic Park and the Cloverdale Recreation Center on April 29th 2017.  The workshop will include both an on-field component at Cloverdale Athletic Park in the afternoon from 1-4 as well as a classroom session at Cloverdale Recreation Center in the morning from 9-12.  The Workshop is open to everyone and BC Soccer is encouraging all coaches to sign up and take part in this great initiative.

“We are really proud to be partnering with these organizations to help facilitate this workshop as it aligns with our strategic plan in helping support our entire membership and the community,” said Jason Elligott, BC Soccer Executive Director. “Having the expertise of all of the organizations collaborating on this project is a huge benefit to the coaches who will attend and I want to thank Sport Surrey for bringing everyone together as well as the City of Surrey, Canucks Autism Network, Vancouver Whitecaps FC and Surrey United Soccer Club for all of their hard work.”


WhiteRockConnect


The on-field portion of the workshop will be split up into three separate age groups, all which align with Long Term Player Development; 6-8, 9-12, and 13+.  Players will be on hand taking part in a festival like setting where coaches will be able to work on the skills and learnings from the morning classroom session.  Please note that depending on the number of coaches who attend, not everyone will be able to take part in the on-field; however, all coaches will be able to observe and engage in conversation with professionals from each of the organizations during the on-field session.

 

“We are thrilled to be collaborating with such wonderful organizations to deliver this training workshop and try-it day,” says Canucks Autism Network President and CEO, Katy Harandi. “At Canucks Autism Network, we believe that positive change is achieved through shared knowledge, partnership, and collective capacity and we strive to inspire, teach and motivate others to be inclusive and accepting. This workshop is a great example of groups working together to create accessible sporting opportunities.”

“We are proud to partner with these organizations for this coaching workshop,” says Whitecaps FC president Bob Lenarduzzi. “Sports should be inclusive and accessible for all. Soccer is a sport that brings people together and this workshop will help coaches ensure that all players have equal opportunities to participate and have fun.”

Anyone wishing to participate in the workshop can sign up here: Application to Attend

About Canucks Autism Network (CAN)
Founded in 2008 by Vancouver Canucks Co-owners, Paolo and Clara Aquilini, the Canucks Autism Network (CAN) provides year-round sports and recreation programs for children, teens, young adults and families living with autism, while increasing awareness and providing training in communities across British Columbia.


 

My Home is Worth How Much Button


CAN programs are delivered in safe and highly supported environments across the Lower Mainland, on the Island and in the Interior. Individuals across the autism spectrum are welcome to participate. To access programming, families must complete an online membership application that includes an annual fee of $25 per individual with autism.

To join today, please visit: canucksautism.ca/join.

 

About BC Soccer BC Soccer is the provincial sport governing body with the mission to govern, promote and develop the game of soccer in British Columbia in a professional and progressive manner. Established in 1907, BC Soccer is the largest provincial sport organization (PSO) in BC and the third largest soccer specific PSO in Canada with over 150,000 participants.  As a professional not-for-profit society and a member of Canada Soccer, BC Soccer is committed to providing the widest opportunities for existing and potential participants, as well as provide support in the most effective and appropriate way for current players, parents, volunteers, member clubs, leagues and districts.

BC Soccer is comprised of more than 120,000 registered players, over 2,200 registered referees, and thousands of volunteer coaches, administrators and soccer leaders. Working with its 40 member Youth Districts and 11 Adult Leagues as well as their affiliate member clubs, BC Soccer operates under the guiding principles of Professional Leadership, Passionate Service and Progressive Collaboration. In managing its relationships throughout the larger soccer community, BC Soccer’s vision is to ensure every British Columbian has the opportunity to be involved in soccer as part of a lifelong commitment to active, health and involved lifestyle.

 


Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

By Kate Horowitz|Feb. 11th, 2017

 

Dogs love food. Some love it more than others, and some of those are Labrador retrievers—the bottomless pits of the canine world. Scientists announced today that they’ve found a gene variant in labs that may explain that constant state of "Please Feed Me." The findings were published last year in the journal Cell Metabolism

 

.


Hungry Lab - HudsonHomeTeam


Dog obesity isn't something we talk about a lot, but there sure is a lot of it. In the U.S. and other wealthy countries, between 34 and 59 percent of dogs are overweight. And yes, fat dogs are cute, but they’re also in danger of some serious health problems. Canine obesity can cause heart disease, strain on a dog’s joints, diabetes, and can even shorten a dog’s lifespan.

Some breeds, like black labs, chocolate labs, and golden retrievers, are more obesity-prone than others. This is likely because, like many of us, they are highly motivated by food. Labs’ human companions learn quickly that a treat is the trick to getting their dog to behave. But those treats add up.

 

The domesticated dog is a single species with a lot of variations. Great Danes and Chihuahuas are both dogs, but their bloodlines, and therefore their genes, are dramatically different. And all those differences within a single species make dog breeds a great resource for scientists studying genetics.

Researchers recruited nearly 400 adult Labrador participants. Of those dogs, 310 were pets recruited through an email invitation from the UK Kennel Club, and 80 were part of an assistance-dog breeding colony. Some of the dogs were fat, while others were not, but all of them were healthy, with no pre-existing conditions.

First, the dogs were weighed. Then the scientists collected drool samples from 33 of the dogs and sequenced the DNA within. The dogs’ owners then completed a survey about their labs’ eating habits.

As relatives, of course, the labs had a great deal of genetic material in common with each other and with other dog breeds. But they also had one gene variant that stood out: the deletion of 14 base pairs from a gene called pro-opiomelanocortin, or POMC. Previous studies of this POMC variant have shown a relationship with appetite and a feeling of fullness.



Each dog could have one copy of the POMC variant, two copies, or none. The more copies a dog had, the fatter and more food-motivated it was. And about 23 percent of labs are carrying at least one copy of the variant.

"People who live with Labradors often say they are obsessed by food, and that would fit with what we know about this genetic change," Cambridge University metabolism expert and lead author Eleanor Raffan said in a press statement.

Her co-author, Stephen O’Rahilly of the Wellcome Trust-Medical Research Council Institute of Science, says these findings have implications beyond kibble. "Common genetic variants affecting the POMC gene are associated with human body weight and there are even some rare obese people who lack a very similar part of the POMC gene to the one that is missing in the dogs. So further research in these obese Labradors may not only help the well-being of companion animals but also have important lessons for human health."

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

Easter Bunny is coming to Morgan Crossing

Mar. 9th, 2017

 

Join us on Saturday, April 8th as we welcome the Easter Bunny here at The Shops at Morgan Crossing. There will be complimentary photos with the Easter Bunny, Easter treats, hot chocolate, tea, arts & craft and more. Time:1-4pm

Location: Unit 110 – 15850 26th Ave (Across from Starbucks)

Plus be sure to post and share you photo with the Easter Bunny for a chance to be entered to win a $50 gift card to The Shops at Morgan Crossing. * Must share and tag on The Shops at Morgan Crossing Twitter,

Facebook or Instagram page

If you would like more information please call: 778-294-2925

 


Easter Fair

Petting a lamb at Easter Fair

Location:
Surrey Museum, 17710 56a Ave

Date & Time:
April 15, 2017
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Contact:
604-592-6956

Bunnies and Other Farm Friends!

Animals and Easter go hand in hand. Join us at the Surrey Museum as we ring in Spring with local rescue animals.  Celebrate their new beginnings and take part in family friendly Easter festivities by donation.

Local animal rescue groups will be onsite teaching children and their parents about respectful treatment and care for animals. Families can get up close and personal with rescue animals, from rabbits to cats and dogs to birds.

Other Easter activities include:

  • Spring crafts and an Easter Egg Scavenger Hunt in the exhibit gallery.
  • A special guest appearance by the Vancouver Rabbit Agility Club which will be showing off their athletic bunnies at 2pm and 3pm in the Museum’s plaza, weather permitting.
  • The Easter Bunny himself.
  • Storytelling in the Museum theatre

Easter at Knapps

Location: 4391 King George Blvd.

Date: 11am-3pm, Apr 17, 2017

Event Details

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 4.00.48 PM (1).png

Spend Easter Monday with us at Art Knapp on April 1st, 2017 from 11am to 3pm!
FREE TRAIN RIDES from 11am-3pm
Meet the EASTER BUNNY!!
Complimentary face painting
Enjoy complimentary snacks and coffee
This is a great event for those with small kids! For the older ones, we have mini golf and lots of cool things to look at! Come and join the fun :)


Farm Tots: Potter’s Bunnies

Crafts in the kitchen

 

Farm Tots: Potter’s Bunnies (1-3yrs parent participation)
Little bunnies hop, hop, hop as they explore Beatrix Potter’s classic tales through rhymes and a craft, then take part in the “Great Bunny Hop-Off”.  1 session for $5.
Thursday, April 6 from 10:30am-11:30am – Register Online (#4519799)
Friday, April 7 from 10:30am-11:30am – Register Online (#4519800)

 


Morgan Creek Easter Brunch

  • Apr 16, 2017  -  10:30am and 1:30pm

Tickets are now on sale for our annual Easter Brunch Buffet on Sunday, April 16th.  Purchase your tickets early as this event sells out every year.  We will be offering two seating options of 10:30am and 1:30pm. Pricing includes all taxes and gratuity.

Adults – $43
Children 5 to 12 years – $25
Children 4 years and under – No charge

Easter Brunch Menu

Tickets are now on sale for our annual Easter Brunch Buffet on Sunday, April 16th.  Purchase your tickets early as this event sells out every year.  We will be offering two seating options of 10:30am and 1:30pm. Pricing includes all taxes and gratuity.

Adults - $43
Children 5 to 12 years - $25
Children 4 years and under - No charge

easterbrunch1030

easterbrunch130

 

  • Easter Event Image

Old Fashioned Easter

  • Apr 15, 201711:00am - 3:00pm

Do you have dreams of a family Easter egg hunt on the budding grounds of a heritage farmhouse? If so, we have the perfect experience for you. The free, all ages event is ideal for making memories and taking beautiful photos. Other family fun activities include:

  • Face painting
  • DIY rabbit ears
  • Bunny Olympic competitions
Event Information

Where: Historic Stewart Farm, 13723 Crescent Rd Surrey, BC
Phone: 604-592-6956
Website: http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/22375.aspx

 


Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Is Fraser Valley the next big market in the B.C. housing sector?

 

 

Latest numbers from the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) revealed that B.C.’s southwestern region has experienced significant home price growth in February, indicating a possible companion to the red-hot Vancouver market in the near future. Last week, the Board revealed that the benchmark price for a single-family property in the Valley increased by 20.4 per cent year-over-year and 0.4 per cent compared to January, hitting $859,300.

 

 

 

 

“This is the kind of February we like to see. Last year at this time, the incredible demand created a market that was difficult for consumers,”

according to FVREB president Gopal Sahota, as quoted by CBC News.

 

 

“Now, we have sales moving upward from the winter months at a typical, healthy pace and a growing inventory to support it,”
Sahota stated, adding that the numbers are so far showing a “return to normal historical sales numbers.” Apartment prices also rose sharply by 26 per cent compared to February 2016 and 1.8 per cent month-over-month, up to $267,000. Meanwhile, average townhome costs grew by 25 per cent year-over-year and 0.5 per cent since January, reaching $422,400. Recently, Finance Minister Bill Morneau assured that the federal government is still closely monitoring the Canadian housing market, amid seemingly inexorable price growth in Vancouver and Toronto. 

 

“We continue to be very focused on thinking about how we can manage what is peoples’ most significant investment. And we do watch the level of indebtedness, in particular around housing,” Morneau stated, adding that “strong underlying markets” continue to drive the two cities’ outsized performance.  “So in Toronto and Vancouver, unemployment is lower in those two places than it is in some other places. Incomes are higher. The economy is doing better. So there are underlying reasons for the housing markets to do better and we’ll continue to monitor, to work with provinces and municipalities who have an important role to play here to manage what we see [as] a challenge, but not one that isn’t manageable.”

 

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

Photo: Andrew Hudson

The biggest challenge Canada faces in creating affordable housing is getting people to and from home and work.

 

"If you think housing prices are high now - just wait."  - Heino Molls, REMonline

 

 

"Census Canada figures show that Canada’s population has rocketed past 35 million. In fact, that number is going to be 36 million before the ink is dry on this most recent report and it will, without a doubt, be going at light speed past 40 million way before 2020. That means a huge boost in housing demand. It means that the privilege of living in a home in Canada, not to mention an actual house in Canada is going to come with a high cost. You think the cost of a house in Toronto, Vancouver or Ottawa is high now, just wait.


Do the math on your own. Not the math of the naysayers, the doom and gloom crowd, the people who will show you diagrams and charts with circles and arrows that pinpoint the exact time and date of the collapse of the real estate market. Rather look around, see what is going on and add it up for yourself.


We are facing many problems in our country. There is not enough time and space here to discuss all the challenges of health care, especially mental health care, as well as housing for the poor and marginalized people in our society. Another major challenge that should be mentioned in the same conversation as housing and property value is public transit.

Our governments are scrambling to build new transit ways and highways to accommodate all the people who will be travelling to and from our inner cities for business, health care, restaurants and entertainment.


How Much is YOUR Home Worth?

 

 


Our biggest problem is going to be building transit, not just within our cities but also from the towns and satellite communities that will have even higher population growth in the coming years. Communities like Chilliwack and Abbotsford in B.C. and cities like Kitchener-Waterloo not far from Toronto. The same for all other cities in the country. Transit is going to be our biggest problem.

 

Falling house prices. Yeah, not so much."

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

It's that time of year again!


Homelife Golf - HudsonHomeTeam


Get ready to dust off your clubs and support Canuck Place Children's Hospice at the 16th Annual HomeLife Charity Golf Classic!
Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Celebrated chef Vikram Vij teams with Vancouver-based Arts Umbrella to offer cooking classes to teens

Feb. 28th, 2017

null

 

Local chef Vikram Vij is partnering with Arts Umbrella’s South Surrey arm to share his culinary expertise with teens.

The celebrated restaurateur will be offering three separate three-hour cooking workshops at My Shanti(15869 Croydon Drive, South Surrey), the youngest of his three local eateries, on March 25, April 29, and May 27. There, budding young chefs will learn the fundamentals of producing a family-style dish alongside Vij himself.

 

“I’m extremely passionate about teaching young people about Indian food,” said Vij in a media statement. “Not only that; this is a perfect partnership with Arts Umbrella. In the same way you take a script or an art assignment and add your own personality, I want these students to take a recipe and make it their own—adding extra spices, different flavours, and to adapt a recipe to something that’s uniquely theirs.”

The classes will help Arts Umbrella, a Vancouver-based non-profit that provides access to arts education for kids, expand beyond its visual art, theatre, and dance offerings to include the culinary arts.

 

 

Chef Vikram Vij’s cooking workshops are open to youth aged 13 to 18. To register for a class, contact Arts Umbrella South Surrey by emailor phone at 604-535-1127.

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Updated CMHC homebuying guide encourages long-term thinking

Feb. 28th, 2017

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., has updated its free guide to the process of buying a home, with an emphasis on encouraging Canadians to think long term about what kind of home they should buy — or whether they would be better off renting.

The national housing agency first released the guide, called Homebuying Step by Step, in 1998, but has updated it over the years. The latest version streamlines the document, splitting off workbook content and making it available online as a series of interactive printable checklists and questionnaires.


Homebuying - HudsonHomeTeam


The previous iteration of the guide received almost eight million unique page views in 2016 alone, according to CMHC.

The guide is meant for any prospective homebuyer, but first-time buyers could particularly benefit from reading it, said Ina Wielinga, a consultant at CMHC who updated the guide. She said the new version puts a greater focus on calculating the true cost of owning a home over time, emphasizing costs like taxes, utilities and repairs.

"This used to be peppered through the document, but we're bringing it up front because people often get focused on acquisition," said Wielinga.

The new guide also encourages readers to reflect on what kind of home suits their lifestyle, and whether or not homeownership is a better financial choice than renting.

"It's not just buying that house that's brick and mortar," said Wielinga. "There's a lifestyle that goes with it also."

By asking would-be homeowners to consider how a home will fit into their lives over the long term, Wielinga said, the guide could help users feel more confident about their purchase.

Key concepts to consider

The most confusing concept in the guide is also one of the most important ideas to understand before buying a home, according to Wielinga: calculating your gross debt service ratio (also known as the gross debt-to-income ratio) and total debt service ratio (also known as the total debt-to-income ratio).

Click on image below for your copy:


 


The CMHC guide for homebuyers is available for free online. (CMHC)

The gross debt service ratio includes total monthly housing costs, which CMHC says should be no more than 32 per cent of average gross monthly income. The total debt service ratio covers all monthly debt payments, including housing costs. CMHC recommends that ratio not exceed 40 per cent of average gross monthly income.

"You have to understand that, even if you're the best person in the world and you know you can afford it, you have to follow that kind of guideline," said Wielinga.

Financial axioms like these are often left unexplained to potential homebuyers, said Wielinga.

"Honestly, it's not talked about enough," she said. "I think when we do explain it to people, then they do get it."

 

Tighter rules

The rules for Canadian homebuyers have been changing quickly, especially as the government tries different policies to mitigate risk in the real estate market.

For that reason, the guide avoids getting into the details of certain aspects of homebuying, like calculating mortgage loan insurance. Instead, it refers readers to the CMHC website, where the details of mortgage rules can be quickly updated as the government changes them.

Lauren Haw, CEO of an online real estate brokerage, lauded CMHC for its interactive workbook for prospective homebuyers, although she's skeptical that many people will actually take the time to sit down and read the guide in full.

"People like to have it and hold it, but most first-time homebuyers don't seem to ingest the information in this format very well," said Haw. "Because even if you give them these documents, very few people are the personality type that will read it and really truly understand it."

Haw said real estate brokers often end up explaining these concepts to their clients as they go through the buying process.

​"If everybody would sit down and read one of these things, I think we'd have much more informed buyers," she said.

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

When it comes to buying and selling homes, most contracts include a contingency that will allow buyers to back out or re-negotiate the sale based on issues found during a home inspection.

Selling a home can be stressful, to feel confident in the sale of your home check out these common home issues before listing.

We recommend a pre-sale home inspection – which may even sweeten your home sale by adding an element of transparency when you share the report with the buyers agent.

 Basement Moisture - HudsonHomeTeam

Basement Moisture

Regardless if your basement is beautifully finished or could have been the location for the latest big screen thriller, a major issue found in home inspections is moisture or seepage.

If your basement shows signs of moisture, leakage or has an air of dampness you may have an issue.  Call a trusted home inspector to get the lay of the land, or a contractor who specializes in basement repair.

The possibility of basement flooding will not appeal to even the savviest of ‘fixer upper’ home buyers.

 

Poor Workmanship - HudsonHomeTeamOutdated Roof

The hat for your home.  Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but if your roof is old you run the risk of facing major leaks during the next rainy season.

If left unattended, an old roof may lead to major damage of other existing home systems and property.  If your shingles are peeling and look old, you likely need a new roof – get on the phone and start calling local roofing companies.



Poor Workmanship

DIYers take heed!  There are (for example) building codes for things like your deck, car port, garage, retaining walls, plumbing, electrical and other home projects and systems.

Outdated Roof - HudsonHomeTeam

If you are going to tackle these projects yourself, make sure to do your research and learn what building code requirements exist in your city.  Better yet, have a professional come double check your work before you pat yourself on the back  – it could save you from property damage, personal injury, costly lawsuits, or the sale of your home.

 

 

 

 

Maintenance

All major components of your home do require maintenance.  Just as you get an oil change, replace brake pads, and rotate tires on your vehicle, your home needs regular attention and cleaning.

Be sure to pay attention to things like furnace and central air maintenance, cleaning dryer vents, water heaters, exhaust fan filers for your stove, check caulking in places like tubs and shower surrounds yearly.  Prevention is better than a cure – and it costs less!

 Checklist - HudsonHomeTeam


 

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

(courtesy of peacearchnews.com)

Curry battle in Surrey: It's Indian vs. Thai in special event dubbed 'Mae Shanti' - White Rock News

 Chefs Vikram Vij (left) and Angus An. - submitted

Chefs Vikram Vij (left) and Angus An.

 

SURREY — The table is set for a curry battle in Surrey next month.

A culinary showdown of sorts will take place at South Surrey's My Shanti restaurant on Monday, March 13, featuring its owner/operator, Vikram Vij, and fellow award-winning chef Angus An, from Kitslano's celebrated eatery, Maenam.

This curry fight is Indian versus Thai.

 

How Much is My Home Worth Button
 

In a ticketed, $125-a-head event, the chefs will go head-to-head as they demonstrate the best cuisine of their native countries.

An and Vij will collaborate on canapés and dessert, but it is the main courses where they will duel it out over meat, seafood, rice and noodles, giving diners the chance to decide for themselves. With each course, diners will also enjoy wine pairings from B.C. wineries.


Another Reason We live in


         #SouthSurrey #WhiteRock



"This Asian curry showdown will take place over five courses where both Chefs and their teams will prepare dishes in the one-night-only 'Mae Shanti' kitchen to represent their respective countries," according to an event advisory.

Says Vij: “There are amazing curries in both Indian and Thai cuisine, and while the ingredients are sometimes similar, they retain distinctive flavours. We want to highlight those differences, while giving our diners the chance to compare the dishes.”

Adds An: “It’s not often I can showcase Thai cuisine right beside Indian curry. I’m looking forward to being able to illustrate the differences to diners as they savour every flavour.”

To reserve a table, email Namaste@myshanti.comwith the subject line “Mae Shanti.”

My Shanti is located at 15869 Croydon Dr., Surrey.

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

(Courtesy of elledecor.com)

Whether you want to add energy to a dull room or calm a hectic one, these are the colors for you.


1 of 12

Orange: Expands Your Thinking

This vibrant hue reduces self-consciousness and allows you to express yourself with confidence. Use it in your home when you want to feel younger. It is the color of laughter and celebration. Add an orange mouse pad to your office, an accent wall to your child's room, or just a bordered notecard on a side table.

Interior design by Ken Fulk

Douglas Friedman

 

2 of 12

Green: Increases Wealth

The primary color in nature, it corresponds with life's riches. It is the color of fresh starts and growth. It will encourage you to honour your unique talents and manifest them in the material world. Try a green chair, side table or front door.

Interior design by Kelly Wearstler

WILLIAM ABRANOWICZ

3 of 12

Green: Also Heals

It represents nourishment and helps steady the body, balancing your equilibrium and encouraging stability. Use it to rejuvenate yourself, to promote physical and emotional well-being. Try a green pot, set of kitchen bowls, or bath towels.

Interior design by Nate Berkus

ROGER DAVIES

 

4 of 12

Light Purple: Enhances Spirituality

It will help you connect to a higher plane. Purple encourages a fresh perspective on emotional issues. By reminding you that we are all connected, it will deepen your sense of humanity. Use it in your home to enhance compassion and to experience friends as family. Try a light purple cashmere throw, journal or fresh bouquet.

Interior design by Rafael de Cárdenas

Roger Davies

5 of 12

Deep Blue: Encourages Efficiency

It will purify your thinking, so you can cut through the clutter and discover what is most important in your life. It helps you integrate the big picture with the little picture. Wear dark blue when you need to make a decision. At home, try it on an oversized tray, a wastebasket, a desk lamp or all over the room.

Interior design by Thom Filicia

William Waldron

6 of 12

Light Blue: Gives a Sense of Peace

It dissolves tension and promotes tranquillity. Light blue especially brings ease into the home and harmony into relationships. Wearing or surrounding yourself with it helps calm aggressive tendencies and eliminates discord. Try a light blue headboard, flowy drapes or painted ceiling.

Interior design by Michael Coorengel & Jean-Pierre Calvagrac

William Waldron

7 of 12 

Pink: Opens the Heart

Gentle and soothing, pink is the color of love. It promotes tenderness and is a comfort in times of emotional transition. Use it in a room when you are trying to increase receptivity and understanding. Try a pink lampshade, table runner or just a glass of rosé wine.

Interior design by Katie Ridder

William Waldron

8 of 12

Bright Red: Fortifies You

It is a stimulant. It promotes courage and fearlessness. Use this color when you want to increase self-confidence. But too much red can make you feel overly excited or agitated. A little goes a long way. Try a bright red candy dish, picture frame, or accent pillows.

Interior design by Susan Hable Smith

Richard Powers

9 of 12

Deep Red: Inspires Passion

It helps awaken the libido. Use it to move you through inhibitions and emotional blocks that prevent you from expressing yourself. It will remind you to live life fully and to love your body. Try a deep red ottoman, lampshade, or accent chair.

Interior design by Martyn Lawrence Bullard

Douglas Friedman

10 of 12

Yellow: Increases Your Focus

This color is known for enhancing intelligence and mental agility. It can help stimulate conversation and clarify thoughts. Try a yellow pencil, bookmark, or side chair.

Interior design by Jeffrey Bilhuber

William Waldron

 

11 of 12

Yellow and Orange: Add Life

These colors help dispel darkness and allow us to see the brighter side of things. Always remember, an array of color is key to happiness: You need the full range of it to feel balanced and fully alive. Try a yellow or orange kitchen towel, throw pillows, or coffee mugs.

Interior design by Mathew Patrick Smyth

Simon Upton

 

12 of 12

Aqua: Inspires Trust

This is the color to use when you need to relax. Wear or surround yourself with it if you have difficulty sleeping, dreaming, or meditating. Try an aqua duvet, vase or painted floor.

Interior design by William Sofield

Simon Upton

 

See also:

 

Mushroom is the colour taking over homes in 2017

 

Mushroom

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

Mushroom

 

 

Warmer than gray but cooler than taupe, this neutral, earthy shade is popping up everywhere. Here's how to make the color work in every space.

   

 

 

 

(Courtesy of elledecor.com)


By Country Living Staff|Jan. 6th, 2017

Constant Trim - HudsonHomeTeam

1 Contrast trim

 

Flip the script (dark walls, white woodwork) and try the reverse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Constant Trim - HudsonHomeTeam

2 Cozy cabinetry

 

The practical tone adds a bit of sophistication to hardworking spaces, such as the mudroom. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Fresh Paint - HudsonHomeTeam

3 Fresh Paint

 

Use this handy guide to find the best hue to complement your furnishings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Statement Tile - HudsonHomeTeam4 Statement Tile

 

A subdued color scheme gives this pattern live-with-it-forever potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  ($28 per square foot; granadatile.com)  


 

 

 

Patterned Pillows - HudsonHomeTeam

5 Patterned Pillows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  (Courtesy of shoplittledesignco.com)


 

 

 

 

Specled Plates - HudsonHomeTeam6 Speckled Plates

 

Mix these dishes in with plain old white ware.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  ($112 for four plates; irwinribera.com)


 

 

 

 

 

Armchair - HudsonHomeTeam

 

7 Armchair

 

A less lumberjack-y take on the buffalo check.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

($2,900; arhaus.com)


 

 

 

 

 

Tray - HudsonHomeTeam

 

8 Tray

Serve up some 'shroom via a pretty platter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

($39; jossandmain.com)  


 

 

 

 

 

Graphic Rug - HudsonHomeTeam

 

9 Graphic Rug

This neutral version of a Navajo print is bold without being over the top. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    ($126 for 2' by 3'; rugsdoneright.com)


 

 

 

 

Marblized Candle - HudsonHomeTeam

 

10 Marbleized Candle

 

This pretty pick is small but mighty — it makes quite the statement and burns for 60+ hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

($40; dlcompany.com)



 

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

(courtesy of urbansurrey.com)

Surrey population surpasses 500,000; doubles Vancouver in growth

tvqvafbSurrey City Centre

Census data released today by Statistics Canada has revealed that Surrey’s population has surpassed 500,000. As of May 2016 last year, the population of Surrey was 517,887, an increase from 468,251 in 2011 representing a growth rate of 10.6%, outpacing the national average, British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, and the Vancouver CMA.

In comparison, between 2011 and 2016:

  • Canada as a whole grew by 5.0%
  • British Columbia grew by 5.6%
  • City of Vancouver grew by 4.6%
  • Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area (CMA): 6.5%

The only Vancouver CMA municipality to grow faster than Surrey was the Township of Langley which grew at a rapid 12.6%. As a whole, the Vancouver CMA grew to 2,463,431.

With Surrey adding an average of 1,000 new residents per month, as of February 2017, the population of Surrey can be estimated to have already increased further to 525,000. It is expected that Surrey will surpass Vancouver in population to become the largest city in BC by 2030.



Looking at growth by Census Tract, the areas of Surrey growing the fastest were in the south and east, in places such as Grandview Heights, Sunnyside Heights, South Newton, and Clayton. There was also noticeably strong growth in Surrey City Centre as a result of new condo developments in recent years, with one Census Tract east of King George Blvd and south of 104th Avenue growing by 33%. This growth in City Centre will likely increase even more by the 2021 Census, with more new condo developments expected to be completed within City Centre in the next 5 years than in the previous 5 years.

Developable land and affordability in comparison to Vancouver can both be seen as driving factors in Surrey’s strong growth.

4apwwpa
Growth rate by Census Tract in Metro Vancouver


 

rps8iju
Growth rate by Census Tract in North Surrey – Area east of King George Blvd and south of 104th Ave grew by 33%.

https://censusmapper.ca/maps/583#11/49.2613/-123.1145

By Stephen Hallingham|
Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

 

In all the excitement and packing, buying & selling, many people forget to take care of some essential items before they move.  Don’t look past these 5 things you need to take care of, or it could cost you $$$.

moving -boxes -HudsonHomeTeam

  1. 1. Take care of all subscriptions: Magazines, memberships, recurring orders, gym memberships.  Get a head start on updating your address or cancelling memberships before charges mount on your credit card.  We suggest you take care of this at least 30 days prior to your move, as many gyms, clubs, and mail subscriptions require this much time for cancellation or updates.
  1. 2. Change your address at the post office: For a small fee Canada Post will allow you to register your new address to ensure all your mail finds its way to your new home.  Leaving bills or an outstanding balance behind, may impact your credit score, as well as lead to accumulated interest charges -–neither of which you are likely o want.
  1. 3. Call utility providers: Cable, internet, electricity, gas, etc…These are all services that you should be making contact BEFORE you move. Many of these services can pivot on a dime so not much notice is required, but we do recommend making contact at least 1 week prior to your move date.  Make a list of required utility providers & check it twice!  Or, you could wind up paying for someone else’s electric bill!

movingbycar - HudsonHomeTeam

4. Manage your motor vehicle insurance: If you are new to British Columbia here is what you need to know; ICBC allows up to 90 days to switch over your license, and 30 days to register, license and insure your vehicle.

If you are moving within the Province, you must update your address within 30 days of moving.  Your auto-insurance policy must always show your current home address and vehicle use, so do not forget to update this information!

5. Get a ‘To-Go’ box ready: Whether you are moving across the country, province, or just down the street, make sure that you have a go-to box ready. This should contain items you will need as soon as you get to your new home; cleaning products, toilet paper, garbage bags, paper towels, clean sheets, fresh towels, paper plates and eating utensils and maybe even a bottle of bubbly to celebrate.


Celebrate - HudsonHomeTeam


Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story
VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – For years, we have been hearing about the entitled nature of millennials. The story goes that those born in the ’80s and ’90s grew up on participation awards and inflated self-esteem.

 

 

They were told that the world was their oyster and that they should follow their passion. The cautionary tale, of course, is that this set of values came at the expense of building the grit and work ethic that their elders had. Whenever someone in the younger generation complains of accessing affordable housing, or poor economic prospects, the comments section blasts their entitlement, lack of work ethic and realism, and points disapprovingly to the fact they can afford a flat-screen television and an iPhone.

But this past week has given us a prime example of why this narrative is so galling to the millennials. British Columbians were greeted with the new property assessments. Property owners — largely generations senior to millennials — saw their property values soar by hundreds of thousands of dollars. Suddenly, the $570 homeowners grant — a property tax subsidy whose full value was restricted to homes under $1.2 million — was in question for a number of newly minted millionaires. The media covered senior citizen homeowners worried about where the $570 would come from, some claiming they would need to move if the ceiling were not raised. Within days, provincial politicians were assuring these millionaires that the grant threshold would rise to $1.6 million. Crisis averted.


 

Sign up for Real Estate Listings & Information Here


Trust Compitence



To understand why millennials would rightly feel that this is a moment where senior generations lost whatever moral high ground they once had, we must compare this episode with a file that impacts millennials. For about 15 years, the BC Liberals have been crying poverty when it comes to improving supports for the young. They presided over an unprecedented increase in university tuition, including moves to increase tuition by over 300 per cent in the most job-oriented fields of study: law, medicine, teacher education, MBAs. Baby Boomers received highly subsidized degrees in those fields. Millennials are expected to pay the full freight, or nearly so. Add to this story the fact that if you need a loan for school, you must first prove you don’t have the financial resources to pay yourself. Provided you meet that standard, your loan carries a fixed-rate option of prime plus five per cent once you graduate from school. Students have been advocating tirelessly to improve this deal.

They have had precious little to celebrate as a result of their efforts.

Now, let’s turn back to the plight of the millionaire homeowner. Take the case of the 60-year-old homeowner who has lived in their house for 30 years — the very people that politicians are trying to protect when they increased the homeowner’s grant (HoG) from properties valued at $1.2 million to properties valued at $1.6 million. Where progress in advocacy on student issues is measured in years, their progress was measured in hours. Homeowners deserve to stay in their homes, after all. Given that the benefit is not connected to income or any means test as student loans are, millennials can conclude that the BC Liberals believe that somehow even the wealthiest of homeowners deserve a handout, too.

While the BC NDP was a bit more nuanced in its position, this was a decision welcomed by both major provincial parties in BC and by city politicians. This was all on the premise that those who got into the property market a long time ago and have had an unprecedented gain in their net worth wouldn’t be able to afford the property taxes that come with their windfall.


 

Planning on Hosting a Garage Sale This Season?



This position conveniently ignores another program that also assumes that those who cannot afford the carrying costs of their homes need government assistance. The BC Property Tax Deferral program allows anyone over 55 to defer their taxes and pay an effectively fixed simple interest rate of 0.7%. While many seniors quite justifiably rely on this program to make ends meet on a fixed income, there is no means test for this program. BC’s most famous billionaire, Jim Pattison, would qualify. What impact does this have in dollars and cents? The answer is $10,000 in unpaid principal under the property-tax-deferral program costs the homeowner $700 in interest over 10 years. Meanwhile, $10,000 in unpaid principal under the student loan system costs the graduate $11,800 in interest over 10 years. Is this fair?

Rather than ensuring that millionaires can afford the property tax on their homes, the HoG simply reduces the amount homeowners need to borrow to avoid the cash flow problems caused by their windfall. Even when homeowners borrow, they do so at a tiny fraction of the cost of student loans. Despite this fact, we had massive political pressure to solve the “crisis” homeowners face because of the appreciation of their properties.

As nearly all homeowners are receiving this grant, those that are getting the short end of the stick are those who don’t own homes. A non-trivial proportion of this category are millennials who are working their way up toward homeownership and who have been told to lower their expectations about what they “deserve,” especially when it comes to living near where they grew up.

The $820 million HoG program could be put to better use. Lowering student loan rates would be an option. A $1,000 a year grant for every child in BC would be another — as that’s the approximate cost of the current HoG. There are any number of programs that would be a better use of this money, but it would take a political magician to navigate a change without losing too much support from older voters.

In all this, though, we have a deeper unexamined and very valid policy question. Should government be in the business of keeping seniors in homes they cannot afford? Seniors who can’t afford to keep $1 million homes have options. They can take a renter, they can downsize, they can take out a reverse mortgage. At a personal level, it is challenging to give up the family home. It isn’t the fault of the senior that their once-modest bungalow in the burbs is now a hot commodity. That said, for every story of a senior worried about staying in their family home, there is a story of a young person unable to find adequate housing and even the odd tale of couples living in vans. In many cases, the seniors defending their entitlement to stay where they have been living for years involves a single person or a couple living in a four- or five-bedroom home. This is not so much about having adequate housing as it is about staying in preferred housing. Being priced out sucks. But seniors get help when they get priced out, while young people who argue that there should be better options for them, even if they don’t have a million dollars, get labeled as entitled.

But the situation is far more intertwined even than the above analysis suggests. A major strand in the Vancouver housing affordability debate has been about why housing is so astronomically expensive. The culprits boil down to lack of supply, no new land, increasing population and foreign investment. For most of the past several years, the BC government has explicitly avoided doing anything that might cause a decline in home values. We were apparently supposed to celebrate the windfall that foreign capital flows had on our markets. Again, this was a policy direction aimed at funding the retirements of Boomers at the expense of the future of millennials, or as one BC MLA told me, this windfall can be used by Boomer parents to help out their kids. Many will and some won’t, but what this MLA was unwittingly endorsing was the move away from meritocracy and toward the creation of a landed gentry: if your parents were lucky enough to win the property lottery, you can hope for a piece of it.

The first problem to tackle is the influence of global capital inflows on distorting the housing market — some moves have been made, but more is needed. We also need to increase the pace of densifying the core neighbourhoods in BC’s cities, despite pushback from those in the Boomer generation who want their neighbourhoods to remain largely unchanged.

While it is essential to address the above issues, we should be evaluating why we use tax dollars to forestall seniors from downsizing. There is good reason to support seniors to have adequate housing, but is there a compelling reason to make it a spending priority of government to ensure that seniors continue to live in large and largely empty houses if they can’t afford them?

Housing turnover is what creates supply in the highly constrained market of single-family houses. Government interventions that reduce the pool of sellers has an inflationary impact on prices. Public policy has to balance the needs of all citizens and currently, the upcoming generation is paying into programs that help freeze them out of finding adequate housing. The policy ecosystem has become unbalanced. In the ’70s, when seniors’ poverty was far higher, and the housing markets were connected to local incomes, the existing policies made some sense. Presently, however, Canadian seniors have a low-income rate that is approximately half that of Working age  Canadians. The problem of seniors needing to downsize doesn’t seem as important as that of young families who face inadequate and/or crushingly expensive housing. Even if these two issues are equally important, that suggests that government should not be redistributing funds from the younger generation to the older generation to keep them in their houses, as they are doing now.

So, we have a tale of two British Columbia’s. On one side, we have the British Columbia where the housing lottery winners deserve to be shielded from the challenge of facing life without a $570 annual subsidy. On the other side, we have the entitled Millennials of British Columbia, Millennials who must lower their expectations in the face of wage stagnation and housing cost inflation.




It is no wonder Millennials are galled whenever they hear their elders trot out the tired line that Millennials are entitled. Watching those same elders protect their HoG entitlement while they gradually dismantle the supports that helped them in their youth demonstrates why this characterization is utter hogwash.


Courtesy of Stephen Price for Maclean's Magazine

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Home sales dropped, prices remained strong and one property type bucked the trend... Let our useful infographic make sense of Fraser Valley real estate stats

REW.ca
January 5, 2017
FVREB-Stats-Dec-2016-crop

Despite a slow December, 2016 was the busiest year on record for property sales in the Fraser Valley, beating out the previous record set in 2005, according to statistics released January 4 by the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board.

Home sales dropped in December but prices remained strong – and one property type saw higher resales than one year previously.

Check out our infographic below to see the breakdown of sales by property type and prices by individual area. 

To read the full story and analysis of Fraser Valley sales from December and the whole of 2016, click here.

 

FVREB-Stats-Dec-2016
Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story
Categories: #SouthSurrey | #WhiteRockRealtor | bc assessments | Best Restaurants | Blanket Drive | BlueFrog Studios | Camping | Camping Tips | Canadian Stats | Centennial Park | Christmas Tree Chipping | Clayton | Cloverdale | Coastal Fc | Community Development | Community Events | Cops For Cancer | Crescent Bch Ocean Pk., South Surrey White Rock Real Estate | Crescent Beach | Crescent Park | Current Information | Douglas | First Time Home Buyer | First-time home | Fleetwood Tynehead | fraser | Fraser Valley | Fraser Valley Development | Fraser Valley Real Estate Board | Fraser Valley Real Estate Stats | Fraser Valley, | Fun & Humour | Fundraiser | Garage Sale Signs | Garage Sales | Gardening | Grandview Heights | Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre | Grandview Surrey, South Surrey White Rock Real Estate | Grandview/South Surrey | Hall's Prairie | HGTV | Hoe Renovations | home buyer information | Home Inspector | Home Owner tips | Home Refinancing | Home Renovation | Home Renovations | huds | HudsonHomeTeam | hudsonhometeam, kitchen reno, South Surrey homes for sale, White Rock homes for sale, White Rock Agent, South Surrey Agent, | Ignite a Dream | local | Local Events | Local Places | localgaragesales.ca | lost Boxer | Marine Drive | Morgan Creek | Morgan Crossing | Mortgage | Moving Sale | Neighborhood Garage Sale | Neighbourhood events | Neighbourhood Garage Sale | Newton | Ocean Park | Ocean Park Community Association | Open House | Outdoor Movie Night | Port Mann | Real estate | Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver | Realtors CAre | Referral | Rosemary Heights | Rugby | Sandpiper Pub | Seed Farm | Semiahmoo | Semiahmoo Mall | Semiahmoo Music Society | Semiahmoo Secondary School | Semiahmoo Shopping centre | Shred-a-thon | South Surrey | South Surrey & White Rock Chamber of Commerce | south surrey agent | South Surrey Open House | South Surrey School Registration | Strata | Summerfield | sunny | Sunnyside | Surrey | Surrey Board of Trade | Surrey Bylaws | Surrey Fire Fighters | Surrey Fire prevention | Surrey For Sale | Surrey Real Estate | Surrey School Board | Surrey school catchments | Surrey school registration | Surrey Schools | Terry Fox Run | Uli's | Watering Restrictions | white | White Rock | White Rock Agent | White Rock BIA | White Rock Connect | White Rock Farmers Market | White Rock Fire Rescue | White Rock For Sale | White Rock Homes For Sale | White Rock Open House | White Rock Real Estate Agent | White Rock Realtor | White Rock School Registration | whiter | WhiteRockConnect | Yard sale

Search Listings Now!

Ready To Sell?

Insider Access

Google+