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During summer 2017, the City of White Rock and the White Rock Business Improvement Association have partnered to bring a free trolley service to White Rock! You can hop-on and hop-off on weekends, holidays and during select special events* from June 24 to September 4, 2017.

There are stops located throughout the City, so check the schedule below to find the closest one to you and begin exploring our beautiful City by the Sea! 

Download the regular map and schedule

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Some special event days have different schedules and/or routes.

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By Julie Sprankles|Jan. 2nd, 2018

 

 

If you're in the market for a house, first of all, congrats! Buying a home is one of the most rewarding — albeit at times exasperating — things you'll do in your life. By the time you're ready to buy, you likely have a sufficient grasp on the basic necessities: a solid foundation, a roof that doesn't leak, wiring that won't cause your new home to spontaneously combust, and so on. But what about the other stuff you should be mindful of? You know, the considerations not covered during your home inspection?

These more personal assessments may not be as "dear-god-get-me-out-of-here" detrimental as a crumbling foundation, but they could likewise affect your quality of life for the foreseeable future. So here are a few things to watch for, as well as the ones you shouldn't sweat.


 

3 Things to Pay Attention To:


1. The amount of natural light

Unless you're particularly partial to living like a cave-dweller, you want your home to have ample natural light. Besides making everything inside look better, it just makes you feel better. Yet this is often glossed over by some buyers during the house hunt. If you have your sights set on a house, schedule viewings at different times of the day to get an accurate picture of the natural light situation.

If you need secondary motivation outside of how beautiful natural light is, consider this: The amount of natural light in your home could indicate bigger (read: more costly) issues. Too little and you may have to add or modify existing windows, which could run upwards of $15,000.

2. The driveway and parking situation

You may be thinking, "Really? The driveway?" To which the answer is, "Yes. Really, really." The dimensions of your driveway could very well determine how quickly your new-home infatuation fades. It may seem silly in the grand scheme of things, but consider your parking spot like an extended part of your entryway. If the drive is too narrow, you'll spend countless hours playing musical cars to squeeze vehicles in. Alternately, if it's too long and you live in an area prone to snowdrifts, you may never want to leave home during the winter months. Street parking may seem like a viable option, but some cities have strict regulations regarding visitors and even overnight parking. Be sure to ask!



3. The neighbourhood

This is the epicenter of the house hunt for many people for one readily apparent reason: You want to like the area where you live. But there are a few less obvious things to consider before you hit the local coffee shop in preparation for your first early Saturday open house. Are there ample sidewalks in case you want to take a leisurely stroll or go for a bike ride? Is it in close proximity to public transportation? If you have kids, there's little doubt you looked into the local school district. Even if you don't, though, keep in mind a better school district equals a better resale value. And, finally, read any HOA documents before you sign on the dotted line. It will be tedious beyond belief, but doing so will alert you to restrictions, bylaws, and other issues that could be unwelcome surprises down the road.



3 Things to Ignore


1. The seller's style

Don't let that Day-Glo paint in the kitchen be a deal breaker. For that matter, don't let any paint color put you off of a home you like. You can always repaint and, let's be honest, what first time home-buyer doesn't want to hand-pick their own hues anyway? Similarly, if the seller's fuzzy toilet seat cover stresses you out, don't worry — they'll take it with them when they go. It can be hard to envision your stuff in a home that currently clashes with your personal style, but try to remember decor is easily changed and offers you the opportunity to tailor things to your own tastes.

2. Clutter

Hey, life is busy, you know? Sometimes a seller just can't find the time to pack up the plethora of tchotchkes littering their living room before a showing. Cut 'em some slack (selling is just as stressful as buying) and think outside the box. Just bring a tape measure to make sure there actually is enough room for your belongings and focus on the condition of the house as opposed to its clutter.

 

3. Unsolicited opinions

You'll soon find that everyone and their brother has an opinion about your potential new home, from the color of its exterior to the quality of the finishes inside. If you feel as though a particular piece of unsolicited advice may be helpful, by all means cull that wisdom. Fortunately, though, you can simply ignore anything else. You're the one who'll be living there and paying the mortgage. Ultimately, the only person you need to please when you pick your house is you.


WANT MORE ADVICE ON HOUSE, HOME AND REAL ESTATE?  TALK TO US! 


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VANCOUVER — An upward trend in housing prices isn't expected to significantly change in British Columbia despite an anticipated slowdown in sales this year, economists say.

The B.C. Real Estate Association's chief economist said Wednesday that new housing stock, slightly higher interest rates and tighter mortgage regulations will result in about a 10 per cent decline in sales compared with 2017.

But demand continues to outpace supply in most markets from Vancouver Island to the Okanagan, which spurs rising prices, Cameron Muir said.

"We would need a combination of a pretty substantial decline in demand as well as significant increases in overall residential supply in order to get to the point in which prices would decline," Muir said.

Nationally, the Canadian Real Estate Association has said tighter mortgage regulations imposed on Monday, including a stress test for uninsured mortgages, would result in fewer sales and reduced prices by about 1.4 per cent to an average selling price of $503,100 this year. 

Bryan Yu, economist with Central 1 Credit Union, said the changes may slow the pace of first-time buyers entering the market or lead to adjustments in what people choose to buy.

While this may slow sales, particularly in the first quarter of this year, he said B.C.'s growing economy and jobs will maintain a strong demand.

"I think the overall economic drivers are still there to support rising prices through 2018," Yu said.



The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver said Wednesday the benchmark price for all residential properties was $1,050,300, in 2017, a 15.9 per cent jump from December 2016.

Sales of detached homes, townhomes and apartments reached 35,993 last year, the third highest total in a decade.

The board considers the sales total more "historically normal," marking a 9.9 per cent decrease from 2016 and down 15 per cent from the sizzling pace of 2015.

A key aspect of last year's housing market was a decline in the number of available listings, a trend the board has said can put upward pressure on prices.

Board president Jill Oudill said 54,655 properties were listed for sale in 2017, a dip of 5.1 per cent from the year earlier.

She also said market activity across the Vancouver region differed considerably in 2017 based on property type.

"Competition was intense in the condominium and townhome markets, with multiple offer situations becoming commonplace," Oudill said in a news release.

The benchmark price of condominiums leaped 25.9 per cent in the Vancouver area last year, while townhomes increased 18.5 per cent and the price for detached homes climbed 7.9 per cent.

Prices have also soared in the neighbouring Fraser Valley with the benchmark price of condominiums jumping 40.5 per cent last year to $388,600.

The Fraser Valley Real Estate Association said the benchmark for single detached homes reaching $976,400, an increase of 14.2 per cent from 2016. The price of townhomes increased by 23 per cent.

Yu said rising prices means people will increasingly be left out of the housing market.

"We're going to see an increase in renters in proportion to the population," he said. "I think that's going to be the natural evolution of this market over time."



 

University of B.C. business professor Thomas Davidoff said governments could improve affordability by encouraging the development of more units in single-family home neighbourhoods and reforming taxes.

"We have high income and sales taxes and low property taxes and that says we encourage people not really to make a living and sell stuff here, but buy property. That's the worst recipe ever for affordability," he said.

Other factors, including political instability, interest rates or natural disasters, could drive down prices, Davidoff said. More likely, a major driver of prices will be what people are willing to pay.

"I do think in the long run, Vancouver will continue to be a very difficult place to buy or to rent unless you're really rich," he said. 

Linda Givetash, The Canadian Press

 


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This summer, the City of White Rock and the White Rock Business Improvement Association have partnered to bring a free trolley service to White Rock! You can hop-on and hop-off on weekends, holidays and during select special events* from June 24 to September 4.

There are stops located throughout the City, so check the schedule below to find the closest one to you and begin exploring our beautiful City by the Sea!


 

 

                    

 

 

 

 

 

                     

Garage Sale Sign

 

 

 

*Some special event days have different schedules and/or routes. The alternate routes and times will be posted on this webpage.

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Is Fraser Valley the next big market in the B.C. housing sector?

 

 

Latest numbers from the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) revealed that B.C.’s southwestern region has experienced significant home price growth in February, indicating a possible companion to the red-hot Vancouver market in the near future. Last week, the Board revealed that the benchmark price for a single-family property in the Valley increased by 20.4 per cent year-over-year and 0.4 per cent compared to January, hitting $859,300.

 

 

 

 

“This is the kind of February we like to see. Last year at this time, the incredible demand created a market that was difficult for consumers,”

according to FVREB president Gopal Sahota, as quoted by CBC News.

 

 

“Now, we have sales moving upward from the winter months at a typical, healthy pace and a growing inventory to support it,”
Sahota stated, adding that the numbers are so far showing a “return to normal historical sales numbers.” Apartment prices also rose sharply by 26 per cent compared to February 2016 and 1.8 per cent month-over-month, up to $267,000. Meanwhile, average townhome costs grew by 25 per cent year-over-year and 0.5 per cent since January, reaching $422,400. Recently, Finance Minister Bill Morneau assured that the federal government is still closely monitoring the Canadian housing market, amid seemingly inexorable price growth in Vancouver and Toronto. 

 

“We continue to be very focused on thinking about how we can manage what is peoples’ most significant investment. And we do watch the level of indebtedness, in particular around housing,” Morneau stated, adding that “strong underlying markets” continue to drive the two cities’ outsized performance.  “So in Toronto and Vancouver, unemployment is lower in those two places than it is in some other places. Incomes are higher. The economy is doing better. So there are underlying reasons for the housing markets to do better and we’ll continue to monitor, to work with provinces and municipalities who have an important role to play here to manage what we see [as] a challenge, but not one that isn’t manageable.”

 

 

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It's that time of year again!


Homelife Golf - HudsonHomeTeam


Get ready to dust off your clubs and support Canuck Place Children's Hospice at the 16th Annual HomeLife Charity Golf Classic!
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This great video really highlights how beautiful it is here in #SouthSurrey & #WhiteRock:

 

 

 

 

 

 

A shout-out to Zack Abelson. Please like his YouTube page. I’m sure he’s one to keep an eye on in the future.

 

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Caring for our neighbours

November 14 - 21, 2016

Each year our volunteers collect donations of blankets and warm clothing for those in need throughout the Lower Mainland.

Since we began 22 years ago, more than 290,000 disadvantaged people have been helped by the REALTORS Care® Blanket Drive.

How you can help

Please donate the following items for all ages:
  • gently used or new blankets or sleeping bags
  • warm clothing, coats
  • hats, gloves, scarves
  • new socks and underwear

 

 

Here's where to drop off your donations: real estate offices

 

 


 

Realtors Care - HudsonHomeTeam


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Translink - SSWR

 

 

Date & Time: October 25, 2016 (5:30 PM - 8:30 PM)

Join the City and Translink at our White Rock open house to talk about Phase One of the 10-Year Vision, which will reduce road congestion and add new transit services in every community, starting in early 2017.

  • Date: October 25, 2016
  • Time: 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.
  • Location: White Rock Community Centre, Gallery

Public consultation on the Phase One plan runs from October 11-31, 2016. Your input will inform the final Investment Plan that's presented to the Mayors' Council and TransLink Board for consideration in November 2016.

Learn more and fill out our online questionnaire by visiting tenyearvision.translink.ca

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Foreign buyer tax has resulted in “policy shock,” but market will quickly recover to see prices higher than they are now, predicts Central 1 Credit Union chief economist

     Courtesy of  Joannah Connolly REW.ca September 20, 2016


Davidoff Pastrick Sommerville and Dachner UDI lunch Sept 16 Foreign Buyer Tax

 


Left to right: Tom Davidoff of UBC, Helmut Pastrick of Central 1 Credit Union and Tsur Sommerville of UBC listen to Arnon Dachner of Dentons at the UDI's September16 lunch panel on the Foreign Buyer Tax — Ryan Broda Photography

 

 

The “policy shock” of the new foreign buyer tax has created a “temporary market disruption” that will play out over the next three to six months, after which “market fundamentals” will mean the market recovers, according to a leading economist.

 

Speaking to a sold-out audience at the Urban Development Institute’s Foreign Buyer Tax luncheon and panel debate September 16, Helmut Pastrick, chief economist at Central 1 Credit Union, said that he expects house prices to recover so that they are higher this time next year than they are today.

 


 

 


Pastrick said, “I fully expect September’s sales to be down again, year-over-year, probably by 30 or 35 per cent compared with last September. The average price will probably fall again, relative to August, and this will play out over the next three to six months – it’s a temporary market disruption.

“After the market has absorbed this new tax regime, we will begin to see other market fundamentals come into effect. Prices will then continue to rise, and they will be higher this time next year.”

Pastrick’s fellow panellist at the UDI lunch, Tsur Sommerville, associate professor at UBC’s Centre for Urban Economics and Real Estate, added, “In other markets where a foreign buyer tax was introduced, such as Hong Kong and Singapore, in both those markets, prices continued to rise.”

Pastrick said later in the discussion, “I think home prices will begin to increase again, but at a slower rate. I expect to see higher prices until this economic cycle comes to an end, as all cycles do… But recessions only last a short while, and the cycle begins again. And in the long term, I would expect that over the next two or three decades, [Vancouver real estate] prices will double again, if not more than double. But there will be more economic cycles between now and then.”

He added, “Right now we don’t see any signs of an economic recession due to a shock event – we’re in a strong economic cycle.”

Sommerville added, “In terms of the demand side, you’ve got the combination of the strong economic cycle, low interest rates, and a demographic profile where you’ve got a large number of young people ramping up into home ownership. There are more Millennials than any other group, so you’re going to have a huge increase in housing demand, in a market where the ability to respond on the supply side is securely constrained.”

Sommerville’s colleague Tom Davidoff, associate professor at UBC’s Sauder School of Business, who was also on the luncheon panel, said that despite the strength of the economy and demand, there was still a significant risk of a sharp correction in home prices due to the foreign buyer tax.

He said, “A potential collapse in foreign buyer demand… could result in a less-bad version of what happened in the United States [in the sub-prime crisis of 2008]. There is a significant risk of an over-correction in prices – but I wouldn’t say that is the most likely outcome.”

The fourth member of the panel was lawyer Arnon Dachner, a partner at Dentons LLP, who warned delegates that tactics to avoid paying the foreign buyer tax – even seemingly legal approaches, such as contract reassignment – could be defined as an “avoidance transaction” that could leave the party still liable for the payable tax or other monies lost to the BC government.

 

The panel debate was moderated by Neil Chrystal, president and CEO of Polygon Homes, who recently told REW.ca that that he thought the overseas buyers’ tax was “morally and ethically wrong” and added, “I wouldn't be surprised if it was challenged legally.”

 


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Joannah Connolly

 

Joannah Connolly

Joannah Connolly is the editor and content manager of REW.ca and Real Estate Weekly newspaper, and editor-in-chief of Western Investor and West Coast Condominium. She also moonlights as the host of the Real Estate Therapist call-in show on Roundhouse Radio 98.3FM every Saturday, 9-10am. A dual Canadian-British citizen, Joannah has 20 years of media experience in Vancouver and London, with a background in construction, architecture and business media. Like many of the residents of her newly adopted town, Joannah has a decidedly unhealthy passion for Vancouver real estate and is often to be found scouring property listings well above her pay grade.

© Copyright 2016

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WHERE: Sandpiper Pub, White Rock
WHEN: September 11 5 – 8
WHAT: Live music, door prizes, toonie toss, raffle and 50/50
HOW MUCH: $20 / ticket ( $10 directly to Semi Rugby) – You get a
Burger, Fries and a Beverage (Beer or Pop)
Kids Welcome – Bring the whole family


Semiahmoo Totems - HudsonHomeTeam

 


 

Contact us for tickets:

 

 info@HudsonHomeTeam.com

604-773-3940

 

 

 

 

 

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Agents, experts say Chinese buyers alone account for much more than 3% of B.C. homebuyers

Asia Real Estate Association of America, Vancouver chapter representatives say the government's data sample is too low to be accurate.

 


 


 

A provincial government statement that only 3% of B.C. residential sales are made to foreign buyers and that Chinese nationals represent just 2.5% of Metro Vancouver home buyers drew rolling eyeballs and laughter at the packed July 7 Asia Real Estate Association of America (AREAA) conference in downtown Vancouver.

“No. Absolutely not,” said an incredulous Byron Burley, Shanghai-based vice-president of Chinese-language juwaii.com, China’s largest foreign residential real estate search engine. “It is way, way higher than that.” Burley noted that millions of Chinese nationals use his site, which has from 3,000 to 5,000 residential listings from B.C. at any time.

“My intuition says it has to be much higher [than 3%]” said Michael North of the Asia Pacific Network Foundation, “just based on the number of people and the number of deals being done at this conference.”

North, COO of Hawaii-based Pacific Royalties, which specializes in linking North American real estate with Asian buyers, had just finished telling the conference that “a next wave of Chinese buyers” was about to crash into the Vancouver market.

“The rollout is accelerating,” North said, citing the recent expansion of China’s Qualified Domestic Institutional Investor program that encourages wealthy residents of China to invest in foreign real estate and stock markets.

 


 


“I would like to know where the B.C. government is getting their statistics,” said North, who estimated “at least 10%” of Metro Vancouver home buyers are foreign nationals.

Finance Minister Mike De Jong said the information was based on residential sales during a near three-week period in June, which began as the province began tracking the addresses of all buyers for the first time.

According to De Jong, there were 10,148 transactions between June 10 and 29 throughout B.C., half of which were in the Lower Mainland. Only 337 of those sales – 3.3% – involved foreign nationals.

“That is a very small sample,” said Tina Mak, a Vancouver real estate agent and president of AREAA Vancouver. “That is the problem. No one has hard data.”

Mak said she suspects that foreign buyers, particularly from Asia, represent a higher percentage in Metro Vancouver than the government data suggests. “But no one really knows.”

Vancouver real estate agents were less cautious in their response to the government data.
“I would say 50% of house buyers, maybe 60% [are foreigners],” said Eve Chuang of Macdonald Realty.

 


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Chuang and other agents at the AREAA conference said it is not the nationality of the buyer but the source of the capital that is important. Money from China, the real estate agents said, can be transferred to a relative with an address in Vancouver, who then acts as the buyer.

North added that, on larger transactions such as multi-family buildings, a Chinese national can open a Vancouver office.

“Name the company Maple Leaf Enterprise and hire Joan Smith to head it. Suddenly you’re a Canadian investor. Actually, that would be a good way to go if you’re a long-term investor.”

 

Burley agreed that is common for Chinese nationals to use local residents or companies as proxies when purchasing foreign real estate. But how many? “I have no idea,” Burley said, “I don’t think anyone does.”

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