Google+

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

By Julie Sprankles|Jan. 2nd, 2018

 

 

If you're in the market for a house, first of all, congrats! Buying a home is one of the most rewarding — albeit at times exasperating — things you'll do in your life. By the time you're ready to buy, you likely have a sufficient grasp on the basic necessities: a solid foundation, a roof that doesn't leak, wiring that won't cause your new home to spontaneously combust, and so on. But what about the other stuff you should be mindful of? You know, the considerations not covered during your home inspection?

These more personal assessments may not be as "dear-god-get-me-out-of-here" detrimental as a crumbling foundation, but they could likewise affect your quality of life for the foreseeable future. So here are a few things to watch for, as well as the ones you shouldn't sweat.


 

3 Things to Pay Attention To:


1. The amount of natural light

Unless you're particularly partial to living like a cave-dweller, you want your home to have ample natural light. Besides making everything inside look better, it just makes you feel better. Yet this is often glossed over by some buyers during the house hunt. If you have your sights set on a house, schedule viewings at different times of the day to get an accurate picture of the natural light situation.

If you need secondary motivation outside of how beautiful natural light is, consider this: The amount of natural light in your home could indicate bigger (read: more costly) issues. Too little and you may have to add or modify existing windows, which could run upwards of $15,000.

2. The driveway and parking situation

You may be thinking, "Really? The driveway?" To which the answer is, "Yes. Really, really." The dimensions of your driveway could very well determine how quickly your new-home infatuation fades. It may seem silly in the grand scheme of things, but consider your parking spot like an extended part of your entryway. If the drive is too narrow, you'll spend countless hours playing musical cars to squeeze vehicles in. Alternately, if it's too long and you live in an area prone to snowdrifts, you may never want to leave home during the winter months. Street parking may seem like a viable option, but some cities have strict regulations regarding visitors and even overnight parking. Be sure to ask!



3. The neighbourhood

This is the epicenter of the house hunt for many people for one readily apparent reason: You want to like the area where you live. But there are a few less obvious things to consider before you hit the local coffee shop in preparation for your first early Saturday open house. Are there ample sidewalks in case you want to take a leisurely stroll or go for a bike ride? Is it in close proximity to public transportation? If you have kids, there's little doubt you looked into the local school district. Even if you don't, though, keep in mind a better school district equals a better resale value. And, finally, read any HOA documents before you sign on the dotted line. It will be tedious beyond belief, but doing so will alert you to restrictions, bylaws, and other issues that could be unwelcome surprises down the road.



3 Things to Ignore


1. The seller's style

Don't let that Day-Glo paint in the kitchen be a deal breaker. For that matter, don't let any paint color put you off of a home you like. You can always repaint and, let's be honest, what first time home-buyer doesn't want to hand-pick their own hues anyway? Similarly, if the seller's fuzzy toilet seat cover stresses you out, don't worry — they'll take it with them when they go. It can be hard to envision your stuff in a home that currently clashes with your personal style, but try to remember decor is easily changed and offers you the opportunity to tailor things to your own tastes.

2. Clutter

Hey, life is busy, you know? Sometimes a seller just can't find the time to pack up the plethora of tchotchkes littering their living room before a showing. Cut 'em some slack (selling is just as stressful as buying) and think outside the box. Just bring a tape measure to make sure there actually is enough room for your belongings and focus on the condition of the house as opposed to its clutter.

 

3. Unsolicited opinions

You'll soon find that everyone and their brother has an opinion about your potential new home, from the color of its exterior to the quality of the finishes inside. If you feel as though a particular piece of unsolicited advice may be helpful, by all means cull that wisdom. Fortunately, though, you can simply ignore anything else. You're the one who'll be living there and paying the mortgage. Ultimately, the only person you need to please when you pick your house is you.


WANT MORE ADVICE ON HOUSE, HOME AND REAL ESTATE?  TALK TO US! 


Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 


VANCOUVER — An upward trend in housing prices isn't expected to significantly change in British Columbia despite an anticipated slowdown in sales this year, economists say.

The B.C. Real Estate Association's chief economist said Wednesday that new housing stock, slightly higher interest rates and tighter mortgage regulations will result in about a 10 per cent decline in sales compared with 2017.

But demand continues to outpace supply in most markets from Vancouver Island to the Okanagan, which spurs rising prices, Cameron Muir said.

"We would need a combination of a pretty substantial decline in demand as well as significant increases in overall residential supply in order to get to the point in which prices would decline," Muir said.

Nationally, the Canadian Real Estate Association has said tighter mortgage regulations imposed on Monday, including a stress test for uninsured mortgages, would result in fewer sales and reduced prices by about 1.4 per cent to an average selling price of $503,100 this year. 

Bryan Yu, economist with Central 1 Credit Union, said the changes may slow the pace of first-time buyers entering the market or lead to adjustments in what people choose to buy.

While this may slow sales, particularly in the first quarter of this year, he said B.C.'s growing economy and jobs will maintain a strong demand.

"I think the overall economic drivers are still there to support rising prices through 2018," Yu said.



The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver said Wednesday the benchmark price for all residential properties was $1,050,300, in 2017, a 15.9 per cent jump from December 2016.

Sales of detached homes, townhomes and apartments reached 35,993 last year, the third highest total in a decade.

The board considers the sales total more "historically normal," marking a 9.9 per cent decrease from 2016 and down 15 per cent from the sizzling pace of 2015.

A key aspect of last year's housing market was a decline in the number of available listings, a trend the board has said can put upward pressure on prices.

Board president Jill Oudill said 54,655 properties were listed for sale in 2017, a dip of 5.1 per cent from the year earlier.

She also said market activity across the Vancouver region differed considerably in 2017 based on property type.

"Competition was intense in the condominium and townhome markets, with multiple offer situations becoming commonplace," Oudill said in a news release.

The benchmark price of condominiums leaped 25.9 per cent in the Vancouver area last year, while townhomes increased 18.5 per cent and the price for detached homes climbed 7.9 per cent.

Prices have also soared in the neighbouring Fraser Valley with the benchmark price of condominiums jumping 40.5 per cent last year to $388,600.

The Fraser Valley Real Estate Association said the benchmark for single detached homes reaching $976,400, an increase of 14.2 per cent from 2016. The price of townhomes increased by 23 per cent.

Yu said rising prices means people will increasingly be left out of the housing market.

"We're going to see an increase in renters in proportion to the population," he said. "I think that's going to be the natural evolution of this market over time."



 

University of B.C. business professor Thomas Davidoff said governments could improve affordability by encouraging the development of more units in single-family home neighbourhoods and reforming taxes.

"We have high income and sales taxes and low property taxes and that says we encourage people not really to make a living and sell stuff here, but buy property. That's the worst recipe ever for affordability," he said.

Other factors, including political instability, interest rates or natural disasters, could drive down prices, Davidoff said. More likely, a major driver of prices will be what people are willing to pay.

"I do think in the long run, Vancouver will continue to be a very difficult place to buy or to rent unless you're really rich," he said. 

Linda Givetash, The Canadian Press

 


Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

 

The Surrey–Newton–Guildford Light Rail Transit (LRT) is the first of two phases in the South of Fraser Rapid Transit Network. It will be an integral new connection to the regional transportation system and will support the current and future transportation needs for Surrey’s growing population.

The project will introduce modern, street-level light rail transit along King George Boulevard and 104 Avenue, connecting Surrey City Centre, Guildford, and Newton with high-quality rapid transit. The project will also introduce the first light rail transit system in British Columbia.

With the roll-out of the first phase of the 10 Year Investment Plan project planning and engagement for Surrey–Newton–Guildford LRT is on track.


Here we have two videos outlining different points of view for what rapid-transit should be in Surrey: 

 

 

 

And the alternative: 

 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story
Categories: #SouthSurrey | #WhiteRockRealtor | bc assessments | Best Restaurants | Blanket Drive | BlueFrog Studios | Camping | Camping Tips | Canadian Stats | Centennial Park | Christmas Tree Chipping | Clayton | Cloverdale | CoastalFC | Community Development | Community Events | Cops For Cancer | Crescent Bch Ocean Pk., South Surrey White Rock Real Estate | Crescent Beach | Crescent Park | Douglas | First Time Home Buyer | First-time home | Fleetwood Tynehead | Fraser Valley | Fraser Valley Development | Fraser Valley Real Estate Board | Fraser Valley Real Estate Stats | Fun & Humour | Fundraiser | Garage Sale Signs | Garage Sales | Gardening | Grandview Heights | Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre | Grandview Surrey, South Surrey White Rock Real Estate | Grandview/South Surrey | Hall's Prairie | HGTV | Home Inspector | Home Owner tips | Home Refinancing | Home Renovation | Home Renovations | HudsonHomeTeam | Ignite a Dream | Local Events | Local Places | localgaragesales.ca | Marine Drive | Morgan Creek | Morgan Crossing | Mortgage | Moving Sale | Neighborhood Garage Sale | Neighbourhood Garage Sale | Newton | Ocean Park | Ocean Park Community Association | Open House | Outdoor Movie Night | Port Mann | Real estate | Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver | Realtors CAre | Referral | Rosemary Heights | Rugby | Seed Farm | Semiahmoo | Semiahmoo Mall | Semiahmoo Music Society | Semiahmoo Secondary School | Shred-a-thon | South Surrey | South Surrey & White Rock Chamber of Commerce | South Surrey Open House | South Surrey School Registration | Strata | Summerfield | Sunnyside | Surrey | Surrey Board of Trade | Surrey Bylaws | Surrey Fire Fighters | Surrey Fire prevention | Surrey For Sale | Surrey Open House | Surrey Real Estate | Surrey School Board | Surrey school catchments | Surrey school registration | Surrey Schools | Terry Fox Run | Uli's | Watering Restrictions | White Rock | White Rock Agent | White Rock BIA | White Rock Connect | White Rock Farmers Market | White Rock Fire Rescue | White Rock For Sale | White Rock Homes For Sale | White Rock Open House | White Rock Real Estate Agent | White Rock Realtor | White Rock School Registration | WhiteRockConnect | Yard sale

Search Listings Now!

Ready To Sell?

Insider Access

Google+